Morning geese

It’s always fun to spend a few pick-ups cleaning-up the dried onions. Here are a few ‘Dorata di Parma.’ Although they’re a lovely onion, and yielded and sized well, they were the last to dry down, and were, in fact, largely still green at harvest. The 2020 rotation plan, at present, calls for a following cover crop rather than a cash crop, which gives us a little more time, but its main competitor, ‘Clear Dawn,’ has been so fantastically early, tasty, productive, and long lasting, that unless ‘Dorata di Parma’ stores longer, this might be its final year. So, enjoy them while they’re out.

It’s always fun to spend a few pick-ups cleaning-up the dried onions. Here are a few ‘Dorata di Parma.’ Although they’re a lovely onion, and yielded and sized well, they were the last to dry down, and were, in fact, largely still green at harvest. The 2020 rotation plan, at present, calls for a following cover crop rather than a cash crop, which gives us a little more time, but its main competitor, ‘Clear Dawn,’ has been so fantastically early, tasty, productive, and long lasting, that unless ‘Dorata di Parma’ stores longer, this might be its final year. So, enjoy them while they’re out.

2019 Week 37, Summer CSA 15 of 26

It may just be the pond on the property beside us, and so perhaps a thing that you do not get to enjoy, but I hope you do: these mornings with their morning geese, cooler out there, and perfect.

Also, hummingbirds make little chirping sounds. If one gets stuck in the greenhouse—as happened yesterday morning—you will hear a sad, lost, and frightened sound that pulls you from your work. And then you will find her, up in the eaves, bouncing off the top of the plastic, unable to get out. And though she may be scared of you, if you find a ladder and a bucket, and are careful, you can set her free. / I had no idea that they could speak.

There’s the chance of rain in the forecast, and so, if you like, you are welcome to grab your dancing shoes, and tap out whatever rain dance you might have in you. You will thank yourself later. :)

My best,
See you on the farm

The fall broccoli come in, and much better than expected. For the last three summers, we haven’t been successful in getting the fall brassica out to the field alive from the greenhouse when planted late (bugs), or to stay alive in the field when planted early (heat and then bugs). And though we lost a lot this year, these broccoli did quite well. The 2020 plan calls for a late summer  in situ  mulch of soybean & millet to precede the fall brassica, but I have been wondering if direct seeding the whole menagerie (broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, kohlrabi, and kale) might actually be the best option. That would be a pretty neat answer, if it turns out to be one.

The fall broccoli come in, and much better than expected. For the last three summers, we haven’t been successful in getting the fall brassica out to the field alive from the greenhouse when planted late (bugs), or to stay alive in the field when planted early (heat and then bugs). And though we lost a lot this year, these broccoli did quite well. The 2020 plan calls for a late summer in situ mulch of soybean & millet to precede the fall brassica, but I have been wondering if direct seeding the whole menagerie (broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, kohlrabi, and kale) might actually be the best option. That would be a pretty neat answer, if it turns out to be one.

It has been so dry this summer, and a lesson on this small, particular development of a regenerative, rainfed agriculture. After a good afternoon trying (‘experimenting’ would be a kinder term) to believe in various seedings of the fall spinach, I popped up over the hill to see all this greenery. It was such a nice contrast to the dry soil I was engaged with before. And though I stopped thinking of C.E. Morgan’s “All the Living,” that book had been on my mind. It’s tough to recommend it for the material—a southern tobacco farm novel—but the writing is exceptional … and who else uses a word like, ‘candent,’ from hundreds of years ago?

It has been so dry this summer, and a lesson on this small, particular development of a regenerative, rainfed agriculture. After a good afternoon trying (‘experimenting’ would be a kinder term) to believe in various seedings of the fall spinach, I popped up over the hill to see all this greenery. It was such a nice contrast to the dry soil I was engaged with before. And though I stopped thinking of C.E. Morgan’s “All the Living,” that book had been on my mind. It’s tough to recommend it for the material—a southern tobacco farm novel—but the writing is exceptional … and who else uses a word like, ‘candent,’ from hundreds of years ago?