The thick of it

‘Scarlet Peony Poppy’ seedheads. Yes, it’s true; poppies don’t make it well from the field to the glass. So, no poppies in next year’s line-up. But why not save the seed to grow them for their field appreciation, and not their cutting? We shall, then.

‘Scarlet Peony Poppy’ seedheads. Yes, it’s true; poppies don’t make it well from the field to the glass. So, no poppies in next year’s line-up. But why not save the seed to grow them for their field appreciation, and not their cutting? We shall, then.

2019 Week 29, Summer CSA 7 of 26

We have had a rather dry summer here on the farm, despite other sites not so far from us having a fair precipitation-year. We were lucky to get 1.5” the other day, but I have been watching the mini-drought effects across the farm, and most especially on the snap beans. This last planting — we plant every two weeks — did not like the dryness, and so I have left their curled funniness in the field as a kind of cover crop, rather than putting them in a bin and apologizing to you. Up next, rather than the standard snap bean, are cowpeas picked at fresh stage. I chose those specifically for their better hot weather production, though it is a bit of an experiment. It’s just a short while before we know how they do — from a yield and flavor perspective. Do let me know.

Having had such dry weather, I have spent all my time in the field, and very little with books and spreadsheets and paper sprawled out across the desk. But this last weekend seemed like a good hot one for that kind of thing, and so I got joyfully busy working on our fall cover crop plan, nutrient regimen, and biological ‘explosion’ program. The soil isn’t where I want it to be, and the challenge of determining just how to get it there is just my kind of on-going challenge. I will keep you up-to-date as the practices arise, but they principally involve getting as much microbiology out into the soil, and then engaging the right kind of cultural techniques to keep it there. Plus a bit of rescue medicine while things establish.

I am emptying out the freezer for our blackberry onslaught. If you would like hot peppers in bulk, they’re there. Otherwise they’re going to the compost pile. Also, Winter members, do note last week’s cherry tomatoes when you get here. Cherry tomatoes are super easy to wash and freeze in a bag for winter. Just pop them out when you need them, and cook. No need to make sauce now. Easy.

Happy Summer,
Austin

Expected Harvest

Greens
Chard
Kale
Lettuce

Veggies
Bean, Soy / Edamame
Corn, Sweet
Fennel
Leeks*
Tomato, Small
Tomato, Large

Roots
Carrots
Kohlrabi
Onion, Fresh
Potato, Irish*

Fruit
Blackberries

Herbs
Basil, Holy
Basil, Italian
Basil, Thai
Cilantro or Dill
Garlic, Scapes
Hot Pepper, Frozen
Mint, Apple*
Turmeric, Frozen

Flowers

Cooking Classes
Get in touch with Cecelia at cecelia.baum@gmail.com to sign-up.

Althea Bread
On break for the summer.

Oh, boy! Here comes the Fall kale. Eight varieties chosen for: fast fall growth, winter hardiness, spring production before bolting, and flavor of the raab. We’ll see what we see.

Oh, boy! Here comes the Fall kale. Eight varieties chosen for: fast fall growth, winter hardiness, spring production before bolting, and flavor of the raab. We’ll see what we see.

Thank you all for being so lovely to our farm campers last week, Moby and Joon. They had a great hot time, but especially when you all showed-up — just for them — at pick-up. They had just had dinner and a bath — and were consequently tied-up for a bit while they dried-off and didn’t roll in the dirt — when I took this shot.

Thank you all for being so lovely to our farm campers last week, Moby and Joon. They had a great hot time, but especially when you all showed-up — just for them — at pick-up. They had just had dinner and a bath — and were consequently tied-up for a bit while they dried-off and didn’t roll in the dirt — when I took this shot.