Aftermath

‘Cherokee Sunset’ Rudbeckia is new to the farm lineup this year. Let’s keep it. :)

‘Cherokee Sunset’ Rudbeckia is new to the farm lineup this year. Let’s keep it. :)

Expected Harvest

Greens
Cabbage
Chard
Kale
Lettuce

Veggies
Bean, Snap
Bean, Soy / Edamame
Broccoli
Fennel
Tomato, Small*

Roots
Carrots
Kohlrabi
Onion, Fresh
Radish, Salad

Fruit
Blackberries*
Strawberries, Frozen

Herbs
Ashwagandha
Basil, Holy
Basil, Italian
Basil, Thai
Cilantro
Dill
Dried Herbs
Garlic, Scapes
Hot Pepper, Frozen
Mint, Kentucky Colonel*
Turmeric, Frozen

Staples
Popcorn

Flowers

Cooking Classes
Wednesday, July 10th: Sold-out
Thursday, July 11th: Space Available
Contact cecelia.baum@gmail.com to sign-up.

Althea Bread
On break for the summer.

2019 Week 27, Summer CSA 5 of 26

Although I will try for earlier tomatoes next year — without organic’s traditional resort to plastic coverings — I am quite glad to have the cherry tomatoes ready, in some small measure, for the 4th of July. Blackberries, too! The first harvest is always a little light, but they will soon be taking much too much of my harvest day, I smile with mock scorn. :)

Although it may still confuse, while we have our last year of the Summer CSA — rather than a year-round approach — I will be noting two limits on the fruit, and setting aside a veggie/greens ‘pickle pile’ — as I have been — for winter. A first limit will be for the summer, the second for what you can freeze for winter. In this case, I am specifically thinking of blackberries and raspberries. If you have any more questions about how the CSA works, let me know! I don’t mean to confuse. :) Also, if you have not yet signed-up for the Winter CSA, you may do that now, to put the berries in your freezer. A $100/Adult downpayment would be nice.

I am very excited to also have some brand-new Kohl-Dill pickles for sale, $10/jar. Katherine at Gathered Threads fermented them, and was really happy with the result. I had them with lunch and dinner today, and had a hard time swallowing through the smile. :) We will try again with another style next time, perhaps her most seriously excellent Chilero, or her Summer Salsa. Let me know what you think.

My best,
See you on the farm,
Austin

Some of the aftermath of the last cooking class, which featured snap beans. We had Sautéed Beans with Basil Purée; Buckwheat and Snap Bean Salad; and Bean, Broccoli, and Edamame Salad with Curry Leaves and Coconut.  Sticking with cooking class etymology, for just this one more time, it is at this point a mostly lost knowledge that ‘aftermath,’ as a word, originally meant the second cutting, as of hay. ‘Math’ in this case being related to ‘Mow.’ So this isn’t technically the aftermath of the cooking class, but why be archaically correct when you can be normally right? :)

Some of the aftermath of the last cooking class, which featured snap beans. We had Sautéed Beans with Basil Purée; Buckwheat and Snap Bean Salad; and Bean, Broccoli, and Edamame Salad with Curry Leaves and Coconut.

Sticking with cooking class etymology, for just this one more time, it is at this point a mostly lost knowledge that ‘aftermath,’ as a word, originally meant the second cutting, as of hay. ‘Math’ in this case being related to ‘Mow.’ So this isn’t technically the aftermath of the cooking class, but why be archaically correct when you can be normally right? :)

Flea beetles sure like eggplant leaves. Some plants co-evolved with insects, using their new aearation as an expected heat-loss radiator. I don't exactly think that's the case here, though. If one current mode of agricultural thought posits pestilence and disease to be ecological garbage collection, it's one more prod on the road to full soil health.

Flea beetles sure like eggplant leaves. Some plants co-evolved with insects, using their new aearation as an expected heat-loss radiator. I don't exactly think that's the case here, though. If one current mode of agricultural thought posits pestilence and disease to be ecological garbage collection, it's one more prod on the road to full soil health.

What a good time of year! The first soybeans of summer arrive. If you didn't take note on the crop label, my favorite way to eat edamame is to boil for 4-6 minutes, drain, salt, and eat as soon as you don't burn your tongue. :) No sooner or later, though, as the enjoyment diminishes with their coolness.

What a good time of year! The first soybeans of summer arrive. If you didn't take note on the crop label, my favorite way to eat edamame is to boil for 4-6 minutes, drain, salt, and eat as soon as you don't burn your tongue. :) No sooner or later, though, as the enjoyment diminishes with their coolness.