Left Field

The first sweet corn -- Bodacious (F1) -- starts to tassel. The tiniest little buds of an ear are also beginning to show. It generally takes 21 days from silk to harvest, so I will let you know the moment I see a preponderance of silks. My hope -- too early on this farm to be yet an aim -- was a July 4th harvest. I removed the early-earlies from the plan, but after having had a June 21st 'baby' corn harvest in 2017, suddenly I miss that date. Next year we might go back to the tiny ones to start.

The first sweet corn -- Bodacious (F1) -- starts to tassel. The tiniest little buds of an ear are also beginning to show. It generally takes 21 days from silk to harvest, so I will let you know the moment I see a preponderance of silks. My hope -- too early on this farm to be yet an aim -- was a July 4th harvest. I removed the early-earlies from the plan, but after having had a June 21st 'baby' corn harvest in 2017, suddenly I miss that date. Next year we might go back to the tiny ones to start.

2019 Week 24, Summer CSA 2 of 26

Once upon a time, I thought to name this ‘Left Field’ Farm, because the best things come out of left field. But a few farms already had that name, and so I went with Atelier, though perhaps the gist is true; this week is proving it. The best things come out of left field. So a long, curious-glancing bow to that.

What a wonderful time it was to meet you all last week. I am so very excited for this summer, and to share it with you. If you like what we have here, tell your friends! :) We’re a young farm, and in need of sales. The CSA, Farm Bucks, and Farmstand are all options, though the CSA is what truly supports us.

A field-note-free update this week because we have so many other kinds of news!

Cooking Classes: If you did not hear last week, new this year are farm focused, vegan cooking classes with Cecelia. The classes are a cozy 4-6 people, and feature the week’s harvest prepared in a variety of ways. Learn all the culinary uses and ways to incorporate the farm into your meals, including vegetable substitutions. There will be 10 class-weeks spread over the summer and early fall, Wednesdays and Thursdays, 6pm, at the farm. At the end, we’ll collect all of the year’s recipes into a farm yearbook and cookbook. Sweet!

Prices: $20 for a single class, $15 per class for 4 classes or more, or $12 per class for all 10. The first classes are right around the corner, Wednesday 6/19 and Thursday 6/20. Email cecelia.baum@gmail.com to sign-up and for additional information, or tell us in person at the CSA pick-up.

Bread: Andrew at Althea Bread will be taking a medical leave for a few months this summer. We wish him all the best in healing and health. June will be the last month for weekly loaves, but he will be back in a couple months to start again. Thank you all for your enthusiasm and understanding.

Honey: Our beekeeper Adam at Sublime Bees harvested several hundred pounds of honey this spring, and said the bees looked better than ever. The rest of their summer honey yield stays for them, but I did buy 50 jars before they were all gone. I will have them for sale at the farm, $10/jar.

Ferments: I dropped a very good quantity of kohlrabi and dill off for Katherine at Gathered Threads. In a few weeks we will have some Kohl Dill ferment for sale on the farm. I’m sooo excited! $10/jar.

Pickle Pile: As we are about 1/3rd sold, we have mucho excess on the farm right now. I will have last week’s extra greens — 100+ lbs — and beans out this week. Free to year-round members to put by for the winter; for sale to summer folk.

See you on the farm,
Austin

Expected Harvest

Greens
Chard
Kale
Lettuce

Veggies
Bean, Snap
Broccoli
Pea, Shell

Roots
Kohlrabi
Radish, Salad

Fruit
Raspberries, Frozen
Strawberries, Frozen

Herbs
Ashwagandha
Basil, Holy
Basil, Italian
Basil, Thai
Cilantro*
Dried Herbs
Garlic, Scapes
Hot Pepper, Frozen
Lemon Balm
Turmeric, Frozen

Staples
Popcorn

Flowers

Althea Bread
Specials of the Month:
June 12th: Flax Seed
June 19th: Einkorn
June 26th: Herbs de Provence and Olive Oil

This fellow got stuck in the wash/pack hardware cloth. Sadly. Member Joe said that as a boy in Ohio they called them, ‘Sand Wizards,’ and a few of you also noted that they’re called ‘Cicada Killers.’ Pretty mighty in the air. We’re sorry, love, for your demise.

This fellow got stuck in the wash/pack hardware cloth. Sadly. Member Joe said that as a boy in Ohio they called them, ‘Sand Wizards,’ and a few of you also noted that they’re called ‘Cicada Killers.’ Pretty mighty in the air. We’re sorry, love, for your demise.

Colorado Potato Beetle (CPB) larvae. Mmmm. They can defoliate whole swaths of a field, so we go collect them for a 'burial at sea.' They have not been much of a problem in the past on this farm, but are a few levels higher here than 'normal' this year. The parents -- and I reckon the larva -- are very good at evolving beyond pesticides. I rather like them for that survivability.  I did not grab a photo, but I observed at least four dead, ‘black’ bodies of the larva. I have seen that many times in the Tobacco Hornworm due to a parasitic wasp, and there is online note of an egg parasite for CPB, but not yet any note about a larva parasite. I’ll keep you informed.  As a last note, this researcher is much impressed with them:  “An important thing to keep in mind is that Colorado potato beetle has a legendary ability to develop resistance to a wide range of pesticides used for its control. High predisposition to resistance development seems to be an inherent characteristic of this species. It is probably caused, in large part, by the coevolution of the beetle and its host plants in the family Solanaceae, which have high concentrations of toxins, namely glycoalkaloids (Ferro, 1993). The first instance of Colorado potato beetle resistance to synthetic organic pesticides was noted for DDT in 1952 (Quinton, 1955). Resistance to dieldrin was reported in 1958, followed by resistance to other chlorinated hydrocarbons (Hofmaster et al., 1967). In subsequent years the beetle has developed resistance to numerous organophosphates and carbamates (Forgash, 1985). Presently it is resistant to a wide range of insecticides, including the arsenicals, organochlorines, carbamates, organophosphates, and pyrethroids. Resistance crisis was temporarily abated with the introduction of highly effective neonicotinoid insecticides. However, the first cases of beetle resistance to neonicotinoids have been already observed in several field populations (Alyokhin et al., 2006; 2007; Mota-Sanchez et al., 2006).” [  http://www.potatobeetle.org/overview/#ins  ]

Colorado Potato Beetle (CPB) larvae. Mmmm. They can defoliate whole swaths of a field, so we go collect them for a 'burial at sea.' They have not been much of a problem in the past on this farm, but are a few levels higher here than 'normal' this year. The parents -- and I reckon the larva -- are very good at evolving beyond pesticides. I rather like them for that survivability.

I did not grab a photo, but I observed at least four dead, ‘black’ bodies of the larva. I have seen that many times in the Tobacco Hornworm due to a parasitic wasp, and there is online note of an egg parasite for CPB, but not yet any note about a larva parasite. I’ll keep you informed.

As a last note, this researcher is much impressed with them:

“An important thing to keep in mind is that Colorado potato beetle has a legendary ability to develop resistance to a wide range of pesticides used for its control. High predisposition to resistance development seems to be an inherent characteristic of this species. It is probably caused, in large part, by the coevolution of the beetle and its host plants in the family Solanaceae, which have high concentrations of toxins, namely glycoalkaloids (Ferro, 1993). The first instance of Colorado potato beetle resistance to synthetic organic pesticides was noted for DDT in 1952 (Quinton, 1955). Resistance to dieldrin was reported in 1958, followed by resistance to other chlorinated hydrocarbons (Hofmaster et al., 1967). In subsequent years the beetle has developed resistance to numerous organophosphates and carbamates (Forgash, 1985). Presently it is resistant to a wide range of insecticides, including the arsenicals, organochlorines, carbamates, organophosphates, and pyrethroids. Resistance crisis was temporarily abated with the introduction of highly effective neonicotinoid insecticides. However, the first cases of beetle resistance to neonicotinoids have been already observed in several field populations (Alyokhin et al., 2006; 2007; Mota-Sanchez et al., 2006).” [ http://www.potatobeetle.org/overview/#ins ]