In it for the clouds

Maybe we don’t get into it for this reason — maybe we do. But at some point it just seems like we’re in it for the clouds. :)

Maybe we don’t get into it for this reason — maybe we do. But at some point it just seems like we’re in it for the clouds. :)

2019 Week 21, Winter CSA 12 of 12

Thank you all, you winter members of the not-quite-a-Winter-CSA CSA! It was so nice to have you here each every-other week, even if I only got to see your car come in as I prepared a field, or weeded the onions. I will be back and in one place for the summer CSA, taking a break from the heat, and enjoying all of your presences. And as to that, the Summer CSA begins in two weeks, on Wednesday, June 5th.

I was struck by two things, most, this week. First, in one week the farm will be nearly 100% full. That is, every single bed on the farm will be growing food. That blows my mind. Up first for the week, though, is a delivery and planting of sweet potato slips (12 beds), the 3rd planting of tomatoes (5 beds), the fifth planting of snap and soy beans (4 beds), and the delayed and we’re-just-going-to-accept-these-soddy-beds-as-they-are direct seeding of polenta-grits corn (18 beds) and dry beans (25 varieties over 42 beds). A new farm layout against currently producing strawberries means we’re going to hang-on mowing and tilling the berries for a bit, and plant the 3rd batch of watermelons, cucumbers, squash, and corn in the greenhouse, rather than the field.

And the second thing I was struck by: All of the great input you have had on farm crops and varieties, which I felt in my excitement for a slew of little seedlings this year: ‘Nufar’ Basil — a consensus favorite — Rainbow Jalapenos — because hot was too hot — padron & shishito peppers — because enough wasn’t — and Asian cucumbers — because they do that better, too. It’s so great to feel this excitement over your own excitement.

I don’t want to take too much from the start of summer, but there will be a bit of chard and kale added to the mix this week. Hip hip.

My best,
See you on the farm,
Austin

Expected Harvest

Veggies
Asian Greens
Chard
Kale
Radish, Salad

Beets
Carrots
Celeriac
Radish, Winter
Sunroot
Sweet Potatoes
Turnip, Winter

Fruit
Raspberries, Frozen
Strawberries, Fresh

Herbs
Ashwagandha
Dried Culinary Herbs
Garlic
Hot Pepper
Turmeric
Winter Teas

Staples
Popcorn

Althea Bread

Winter CSA Dates

05/22/19

The general order of appearance of the berries is this: June 1st, Strawberries; July 1st, Blackberries; August 1st, Raspberries. Although I will be mowing and tilling the strawberries in this year — some even before we get to pick them — due to a new farm plan, we have at least one more week of harvest before they start to go. Plus, look at all these blackberry flowers. :)

The general order of appearance of the berries is this: June 1st, Strawberries; July 1st, Blackberries; August 1st, Raspberries. Although I will be mowing and tilling the strawberries in this year — some even before we get to pick them — due to a new farm plan, we have at least one more week of harvest before they start to go. Plus, look at all these blackberry flowers. :)

A good morning spent cleaning-up some of the spring greens. L-R, Scarlet Kale x 3, Nash Kale, x 1, Argentata Chard x 2, Pink Passion Chard x 1, & Gator Perpetual Spinach / Leafbeet / Chard x 1. I also seeded a later planting of Lacinato / Tuscan / Dinosaur kale, per request, which makes 2/3 of both Kale and Chard varieties new to the farm this year.

A good morning spent cleaning-up some of the spring greens. L-R, Scarlet Kale x 3, Nash Kale, x 1, Argentata Chard x 2, Pink Passion Chard x 1, & Gator Perpetual Spinach / Leafbeet / Chard x 1. I also seeded a later planting of Lacinato / Tuscan / Dinosaur kale, per request, which makes 2/3 of both Kale and Chard varieties new to the farm this year.

Scarlet Kale. Spring / Summer and Fall kales fulfill different roles, from both a farm cultural and culinary perspective. Spring kale has more cabbage worm issues — which we deal with by planting those varieties which are most resistant / unbothered — while fall kale has need for both cold tolerance and late spring bolting — because it gives us a week or two longer of spring ‘hunger gap’ harvest before it flowers. In the kitchen, I prefer a lighter kale in the spring, and a heavier one in the fall … as the cold comes on.  This particular variety, ‘Scarlet,’ is new to the farm, but comes well regarded by other growers for staying tender into summer. I’m excited to see how it fairs, so let me know what you taste.

Scarlet Kale. Spring / Summer and Fall kales fulfill different roles, from both a farm cultural and culinary perspective. Spring kale has more cabbage worm issues — which we deal with by planting those varieties which are most resistant / unbothered — while fall kale has need for both cold tolerance and late spring bolting — because it gives us a week or two longer of spring ‘hunger gap’ harvest before it flowers. In the kitchen, I prefer a lighter kale in the spring, and a heavier one in the fall … as the cold comes on.

This particular variety, ‘Scarlet,’ is new to the farm, but comes well regarded by other growers for staying tender into summer. I’m excited to see how it fairs, so let me know what you taste.

I walked the perimeter with the mower the other day, and was pleasantly surprised by several ‘new’ views of the farm. It’s always nice to step outside the fence. That cumulonimbus turned thunderhead broke about an hour later.

I walked the perimeter with the mower the other day, and was pleasantly surprised by several ‘new’ views of the farm. It’s always nice to step outside the fence. That cumulonimbus turned thunderhead broke about an hour later.