So much goodness

That rare morning, with features so amazing, even color would be gaudy.

That rare morning, with features so amazing, even color would be gaudy.

2019 Week 11, Winter CSA 8 of 12

Expected Harvest

Greens
Spinach

Veggies
Beets
Carrots
Celeriac
Radish, Winter
Sunroot
Sweet Potatoes
Turnip, Winter

Fruit
Raspberries
Strawberries

Herbs
Ashwagandha
Dried Culinary Herbs
Garlic
Ginger
Hot Pepper
Turmeric
Winter Teas

Staples
Popcorn

Althea Bread

Winter CSA Dates

03/13/19, 03/27/19, 04/10/19, 04/24/19, 05/08/19, 05/22/19

Last week’s tractor marathon didn’t exactly start, but ended nonetheless … with two great comments on the phone. The first, from the local mechanic, “Your timing chain is gone; down in there, gone; in the crank case, gone.” And the second, from Joel at Earth Tools, the dealer, “Jeez. You really would like a reliable machine. You’ve been having trouble with this one. Like whoever put it together did it at the end of the day, Friday. If you drop it off, I can put a Honda on it, and use yours for parts.” So, a new engine, with a new warranty, for one-third the price of a new one … plus a road trip to Kentucky. That’s the deal on tap for the end of the week. In the meantime, we will be renting a four-wheel tractor to prep the fields in a hurry.

If you have not noticed, that rain from last year never actually let up, and we have had some pretty consistent field moisture. The current situation offers an interesting option to gamble. We need the entire farm to be prepped, spread, and rolled in the next 20 days. Is this the driest we get, or is the future drier? This Friday’s forecast is for 0.2 inches … in a thunderstorm. Do we trust that simple number, which knows nothing of storm burstiness, nor the week that follows? I’m not a gambler, and so we don’t. We wait until Wednesday, rent a tractor, and prep with what is the driest soil we have in the present … and accept the future for what it is: unknown. What an interesting and great way to start the year, with acceptance.

A quick, final note. I was standing in the fields, newly warmed, just smelling them … and I had a feeling. It was a feeling about farming, but it came to me like surfing. We paddle out all winter to the big swell forming, and this takes a long time. We get used to the direction, and the pace. Then, all of a sudden, the forces change, the swell swells, and we turn around, paddle like mad men and women for that lip which holds us for the pop-up. And then we do, pop-up, and take the long slide down for autumn, where nothing comes from fighting forces, but everything comes from surfing them.

That’s what I saw, and that’s what we’re feeling … that it’s just nearly time to turn around, and paddle like mad. Woot, woot!

See you all on the farm,
Austin

Thank you all, you early members. Ginger goes on sale, and sells out, in November. I wasn’t sure, at first, if we’d have any to plant this year … but you made it happen! :)  We’re sticking with the ‘Indira Yellow’ turmeric, as it grows so well in our climate. But we are moving back to the Hawaiian ‘Bubba Baba Blue’ ginger, as opposed to last year’s Thai ‘Khing Yai,’ per yield trials from two years ago. The mature ginger, being blue, scared me a little … but we can’t reach maturity in this climate, and so never really get that seemingly-off color. Thanks again!  Oh, and for those who might be wondering, like I know some are: Ginger, apparently, originates in maritime Austronesia — think Polynesia, Indonesia, Malaysia, etc.

Thank you all, you early members. Ginger goes on sale, and sells out, in November. I wasn’t sure, at first, if we’d have any to plant this year … but you made it happen! :)

We’re sticking with the ‘Indira Yellow’ turmeric, as it grows so well in our climate. But we are moving back to the Hawaiian ‘Bubba Baba Blue’ ginger, as opposed to last year’s Thai ‘Khing Yai,’ per yield trials from two years ago. The mature ginger, being blue, scared me a little … but we can’t reach maturity in this climate, and so never really get that seemingly-off color. Thanks again!

Oh, and for those who might be wondering, like I know some are: Ginger, apparently, originates in maritime Austronesia — think Polynesia, Indonesia, Malaysia, etc.