The present future

In the summer, maybe, we do not find ourselves so often on our belly, looking at what the land is giving. And maybe that’s a deficit we need to correct. But in spring, yes, absolutely. I don’t think there is one spring flush of garlic that hasn’t pulled me chin to ground.  You would hardly believe it, but we’ve spent about $4k trying to install garlic on the farm over the last two years, having met significant rot each spring. The return this year, I am most happy to say, looks fantastic! — thanks, perhaps, to not mulching it, and giving the ground a chance to desiccate just a bit. We risk frost-heave and cold damage without a protective mulch, but found little-to-none of that this year. We also risk weeds! which we will attend to diligently this spring.  I recently reviewed Filaree Garlic Farm’s expansive offerings, and might spend a little bit more to identify — by growing them — varieties that are happy on our farm. For instance, although the ‘Silver White’ Silverskin may not be your favorite — fine flavor, but a softneck with many small cloves to peel — it stores the longest and has been the healthiest crop two years running. Are there others like it?

In the summer, maybe, we do not find ourselves so often on our belly, looking at what the land is giving. And maybe that’s a deficit we need to correct. But in spring, yes, absolutely. I don’t think there is one spring flush of garlic that hasn’t pulled me chin to ground.

You would hardly believe it, but we’ve spent about $4k trying to install garlic on the farm over the last two years, having met significant rot each spring. The return this year, I am most happy to say, looks fantastic! — thanks, perhaps, to not mulching it, and giving the ground a chance to desiccate just a bit. We risk frost-heave and cold damage without a protective mulch, but found little-to-none of that this year. We also risk weeds! which we will attend to diligently this spring.

I recently reviewed Filaree Garlic Farm’s expansive offerings, and might spend a little bit more to identify — by growing them — varieties that are happy on our farm. For instance, although the ‘Silver White’ Silverskin may not be your favorite — fine flavor, but a softneck with many small cloves to peel — it stores the longest and has been the healthiest crop two years running. Are there others like it?

2019 Week 09, Winter CSA 7 of 12

What a great week we’ve had, and will have! I seeded the broccoli family crops — broccoli, cabbage, kale, and kohlrabi — in the greenhouse on Monday. The spring has had its way with them the last two years, but we are trying a few new things to keep them alive after transplant — a more thorough hardening-off process, a pine-based wash to prevent post-transplant desiccation, and a “we’re not in New Hampshire anymore” approach to soil moisture — i.e., the ground isn’t necessarily, and probably actually isn’t, sodden in the spring. The cabbage and the kohlrabi comprise a significant chunk of this batch, as our new fermentation partner, Gathered Threads, will be culturing them this summer. Hip hip.

This is also the week we scramble to prepare the farm for its new living mulch mix. That means we till, seed, and roll the entire annual half of the farm. I really do like how easy it is to just say a thing, as opposed to do it. Because that sure was easy to say. :) If you don’t see me in the greenhouse at pick-up, I’m out there doing that.

A reminder that we still have some shares to sell for this summer, AND that you get 10% cash back of every dollar you successfully refer into the CSA.

Enjoy the weather, &
See you on the farm,
Austin

Expected Harvest

Greens
Spinach

Veggies
Beets
Carrots
Celeriac
Radish, Winter
Sunroot
Sweet Potatoes
Turnip, Winter

Fruit
Raspberries
Strawberries

Herbs
Ashwagandha
Dried Culinary Herbs
Garlic
Ginger
Hot Pepper
Turmeric
Winter Teas

Staples
Popcorn

Althea Bread

Winter CSA Dates

02/27/19, 03/13/19, 03/27/19, 04/10/19, 04/24/19, 05/08/19, 05/22/19

We’ve finally hit a string of dry weather for the orchard’s annual haircut. Welcome to the present future. One doesn’t actually prune the tree in front of you, but the tree three to five years ahead of you. Which branches will be crossing? What hormones will flow, and how will the branches angles, with this cut? I can pretty confidently say I’m not all that good at it just yet, because the feedback that makes you better, in pruning, is always a few years off.

We’ve finally hit a string of dry weather for the orchard’s annual haircut. Welcome to the present future. One doesn’t actually prune the tree in front of you, but the tree three to five years ahead of you. Which branches will be crossing? What hormones will flow, and how will the branches angles, with this cut? I can pretty confidently say I’m not all that good at it just yet, because the feedback that makes you better, in pruning, is always a few years off.

It was meant for spreading peat moss or compost … but it made it through about 30,000 pounds of rock dust before it bit the … umm. I may find a welder to fix what broke, and add some reinforcement, or not.

It was meant for spreading peat moss or compost … but it made it through about 30,000 pounds of rock dust before it bit the … umm. I may find a welder to fix what broke, and add some reinforcement, or not.

There’s a bit of foolish pride in the joy that comes in seeing one survive what one’s tools do not.

There’s a bit of foolish pride in the joy that comes in seeing one survive what one’s tools do not.