That darling hut

Time to reef the sails and throw on the windbreaker.

Time to reef the sails and throw on the windbreaker.

Expected Harvest

Greens
Spinach

Veggies
Beets
Carrots
Celeriac
Radish, Winter
Sunroot
Sweet Potatoes
Turnip, Winter

Fruit
Raspberries
Strawberries

Herbs
Ashwagandha
Dried Culinary Herbs
Garlic
Ginger
Hot Pepper
Turmeric
Winter Teas

Staples
Popcorn

Althea Bread

Winter CSA Dates

02/13/19, 02/27/19, 03/13/19, 03/27/19, 04/10/19, 04/24/19, 05/08/19, 05/22/19

2019 Week 07, Winter CSA 6 of 12

There were bluebirds sitting on the irrigation risers as I spread the rock dust, and there is now birdsong in the morning before the dawn. Onions are waking in their seedling trays, and I’m having to slap myself for adding another new hot pepper here, or a curious pickling cucumber there. It’s time! The new season is on, and we get to transfer our focus from design to build, and then, later, from build to ride. As always, thank you all for being along for that ride.

See you on the farm,
Austin

PS, most tangentially: I can remember the April afternoon when I learned that Gabriel Garcia Marquez had died. It is like that, too, with Mary Oliver. And so we should not let that passing pass without some kind of witnessing.

One of my favorite lines of hers is from a semi-poem — her “Sand Dabs,” which she slipped into her pocket as she walked her Cape Cod beach — and it’s what I heard in my head when I heard that she had gone:

Myself, myself, myself, that darling hut!
How quick it will burn!

(Mary Oliver, ‘Sand Dabs, Five’, Winter Hours)

And then I saw these lines, last week — translated by the most impressive Jane Hirshfield: “The moon in Japanese poetry is always the moon” — and knew that they all were sisters:

Although the wind
blows terribly here,
the moonlight also leaks
between the roof planks
of this ruined house.

(Izumi Shikibu (Japan, 974?-1034?) [translated by Jane Hirshfield with Mariko Aratani])

And saw that the question I was asking, she had already answered:

After I published Women in Praise of the Sacred: 43 Centuries of Spiritual Poetry by Women, people often asked me how the spiritual poetry of women differs from that of men. My answer: more imagery of houses. (The earlier poem here by Izumi Shikibu also uses the image of a house to speak of the experience of self and its boundaries.) To become the authority of one’s own household is no small thing in many women’s lives, even now, and the lives of earlier women poets are almost always marked by some fracturing with the expectations and course of ordinary life. The same is often true for men, of course, especially mystics.

Which is a much too long and digressing way to say:

Thank you, Mary.

One of the challenges of the small scale farm is designing human-powered tools to improve the health of the farm and farmer, when it comes to the farming.  After literally throwing out the first 2400 pounds of rock dust by hand — left hand, right hand, left hand, right hand — I decided there had to be a better way for the next 27,600. We’re only halfway there, but it’s pretty wild what wheels can do. Wagon + 8 buckets = 600 lbs of rock dust relatively easily rolled out to site, where 200 lbs fit into a modified — all I had was fluorescent orange gorilla tape — peat moss spreader to hit the right application rate. It’s good to do on a cold day, and it still makes you hungry … but we only do this once! :)  Here’s to doing everything we can to make 2019 rock! (Oh shoot, was that an unintended pun?)

One of the challenges of the small scale farm is designing human-powered tools to improve the health of the farm and farmer, when it comes to the farming.

After literally throwing out the first 2400 pounds of rock dust by hand — left hand, right hand, left hand, right hand — I decided there had to be a better way for the next 27,600. We’re only halfway there, but it’s pretty wild what wheels can do. Wagon + 8 buckets = 600 lbs of rock dust relatively easily rolled out to site, where 200 lbs fit into a modified — all I had was fluorescent orange gorilla tape — peat moss spreader to hit the right application rate. It’s good to do on a cold day, and it still makes you hungry … but we only do this once! :)

Here’s to doing everything we can to make 2019 rock! (Oh shoot, was that an unintended pun?)

Halfway into allium seeding — fresh onions, storage onions, shallots, perennial scallions, and leeks — plus perennial flowers, most of which are hanging-out in the walk-in for their moist-cold stratification. Everything is new for me on the farm again this year, with a new “Row Crop Living Mulch” (RCLM) 3-ft row system. Onions, in this case, get their own row, transplanted as multi-plant blocks. I’m excited to see what happens.

Halfway into allium seeding — fresh onions, storage onions, shallots, perennial scallions, and leeks — plus perennial flowers, most of which are hanging-out in the walk-in for their moist-cold stratification. Everything is new for me on the farm again this year, with a new “Row Crop Living Mulch” (RCLM) 3-ft row system. Onions, in this case, get their own row, transplanted as multi-plant blocks. I’m excited to see what happens.

Hanging-out in the greenhouse were last year’s trial polenta corn seeds, and a wee passel of garlic bulbils. If one were concerned about the transfer of soil-borne disease, saving garlic bulbils and planting from that would help — as opposed to planting from saved bulbs — though there is no cross-pollination, and they are also clones of their parent.

Hanging-out in the greenhouse were last year’s trial polenta corn seeds, and a wee passel of garlic bulbils. If one were concerned about the transfer of soil-borne disease, saving garlic bulbils and planting from that would help — as opposed to planting from saved bulbs — though there is no cross-pollination, and they are also clones of their parent.

Because it blows my mind every single year: the first onions pop.

Because it blows my mind every single year: the first onions pop.