Wind down

Is it just the coolness, that things seem more still? Or the angle of light that we now have?

Is it just the coolness, that things seem more still? Or the angle of light that we now have?

2019 Week 41, Summer CSA 19 of 26

Maybe we are reverting to the mean, temperature-wise, as we are just days away from the average first frost, and it does feel a little nippy on the farm right now. But water-wise we are still off. No need to harp on the obvious, so I won’t. :)

At this time of year, it is nice to move attention back to some of the less squeaky parts of the farm, like the strawberries — newly planted this spring, and now halfway through a good fall cleaning — and the perennial herbs, soon to get their due. The fence is low in a few parts, and so I will walk that today with wire, against the deer. And it is also, at last, not-sunny enough for another solublized rock spray on the roots; good for them, though no substitute for rain.

Although the first bed of sweet potatoes came in at 20% of expected yield, the second was up to 40%. So, a good “Woot!” to that. Let’s all cross our fingers, eyes, and toes that the next 10 keep it up.

Do note, we are having an Open House and Field Walk on Sunday, October 13th, 2-4pm. You are all welcome, but especially if you are curious to see where we are and where we’re going.

Oh, right, before I forget: the Farmshare CSA and Farmbucks are on sale until the end of the year!

My best,
See you on the farm,
Austin

Expected Harvest

Veggies
Bean, Snap
Bean, Soy / Edamame
Okra
Pepper, Sweet
Squash, Summer
Tomato, Large*
Tomato, Small

Roots
Carrots
Onion
Potato, Irish
Potato, Sweet

Herbs
Basils, as they pan out
Garlic
Lemongrass
Pepper, Hot
Turmeric, Frozen

Flowers

Farm Honey & Ferments for sale.

Cooking Classes
Get in touch with Cecelia at cecelia.baum@gmail.com to sign-up.

Althea Bread is back!

These cute little "Persian Carpet" zinnias are new this year, but are perhaps a little too short in their stem length for bouquets. I don't think I'll keep them on to 2020, so enjoy them while they last.

These cute little "Persian Carpet" zinnias are new this year, but are perhaps a little too short in their stem length for bouquets. I don't think I'll keep them on to 2020, so enjoy them while they last.

Edamame / soy bean root nodulation. I've cut the nodules in half to check for the presence -- by pink'ish color -- of nitrogen fixing bacteria. We mix an innoculant of the proper species into all of our legume seeds at seeding, but one never knows if they'll take, or if there is enough background bacteria of the proper species already in the soil. Legumes will use available soil nitrogen until they need to fix their own. Although this was soy for eating, the same is applicable for our cover crop mixes, where density of seeding induce competition, and thus nitrogen fixation.

Edamame / soy bean root nodulation. I've cut the nodules in half to check for the presence -- by pink'ish color -- of nitrogen fixing bacteria. We mix an innoculant of the proper species into all of our legume seeds at seeding, but one never knows if they'll take, or if there is enough background bacteria of the proper species already in the soil. Legumes will use available soil nitrogen until they need to fix their own. Although this was soy for eating, the same is applicable for our cover crop mixes, where density of seeding induce competition, and thus nitrogen fixation.

Here is some nodulation without noticeable bacteria. The preponderance of those I dug up were pink, so that's good.

Here is some nodulation without noticeable bacteria. The preponderance of those I dug up were pink, so that's good.

Monarchs have been all over the farm of late. Although they are on the Tithonia here, they have also been big fans of the red clover.

Monarchs have been all over the farm of late. Although they are on the Tithonia here, they have also been big fans of the red clover.