Wheels

Leopold used to walk home from his campus office mid-day to take a nap. Lover — how weak a word — of birds as he was, he was usually up and out the door at 3:30 in the morning to listen to that chorus. And thus the nap. There was a time when I don’t think I would have understood him, but a winter in the Catskills — really in winter, and really in the Catskills — corrected that. How many other miracles are we blind to?  Bird-hop in snow on the office porch. / The entirety of the earth — and being alive on it — right there. Shibboleth though the shot may be.

Leopold used to walk home from his campus office mid-day to take a nap. Lover — how weak a word — of birds as he was, he was usually up and out the door at 3:30 in the morning to listen to that chorus. And thus the nap. There was a time when I don’t think I would have understood him, but a winter in the Catskills — really in winter, and really in the Catskills — corrected that. How many other miracles are we blind to?

Bird-hop in snow on the office porch. / The entirety of the earth — and being alive on it — right there. Shibboleth though the shot may be.

2019 Week 03, Winter CSA 4 of 13

It was almost dry, for a moment there, last week. And though digging another bin of sunroot proved that it really wasn’t, that string of sunny days was our best shot in a long while to get a round of minerals out onto the farm … and so I did. The parking area is finally clear of pallets thanks to that effort — including an 8,000 pound day where we learned again how impressive wheels are, doing this all by hand and foot.

Thanks to a new member, we also have the funds to get a dumpload of basalt rock dust from a local quarry. The mode of action and the results are still under discussion, but the gist is that under strong biological conditions, and especially on “old” eroded soil like ours, it provides a missing foundation of plant health for a very long while. I am crossing all biological options off the “Do everything you can to make everything better” list, and this one comes next.

By the next CSA pick-up, the greenhouse will be up and running with onions and perennial flowers seeded in their trays. The long, disparate list of things-to-do that was a mountainside of separate springs all winter long, is about to come down into one big frothy flume. How exciting that that — the annual Spring blast-off into a new year — is (still) so exciting. I just checked the spreadsheet, and it looks like there are over two hundred new crop and flower varieties — out of over 400 total, among annuals — on the farm in 2019. Disease-resistance-paired-with-heirloom-flavor is the (Germanic, it seems) buzzword of the year, and I am quite anticipating all the comparison trials.

Spreadsheet checking got me curious, and it also looks like despite the crazy — if Thoreau was an immortal and had farmed from his 18th birthday until now, he would never have seen a year like last year — year, folks who came every pick-up got 20% more than they paid for. Meaning, missing more than a whole month still got you even, despite the farm tripping along at 20% production. See! Miracles all over.

Note: If a potentially-snowy driveway scares you, let me know another day and time that you might stop by to peruse the walk-in fridge and chest freezer. Spinach is harvest-dependent upon snowmelt, but I am aiming to give it a go Wednesday at 11am, when the leaves should have a chance to thaw.

My best,
See you on the farm,
Austin

Expected Harvest

Greens
Spinach — snow-melt depending

Veggies
Beets
Carrots
Celeriac
Radish, Winter
Sunroot
Sweet Potatoes
Turnip, Winter

Fruit
Raspberries
Strawberries

Herbs
Ashwagandha
Dried Culinary Herbs
Garlic
Ginger
Hot Pepper
Turmeric
Winter Teas

Staples
Popcorn

Althea Bread
Danish Sprouted Rye
Local Country Wheat
Red Corn Porridge Bread

Winter CSA Dates

01/16/19, 01/30/19, 02/13/19, 02/27/19, 03/13/19, 03/27/19, 04/10/19, 04/24/19, 05/08/19, 05/22/19

In Latin,  carina , is the keel of a boat. In English, it is also the breastbone of a bird.

In Latin, carina, is the keel of a boat. In English, it is also the breastbone of a bird.