Basil

 Out harvesting the flowers, I saw this little guy. It reminded me a little of the cover of the  spanish-language Neruda memoirs . And I got to thinking, like I always do about that book: In Spanish, the title is, 'Confieso que he vivido' -- "I confess that I have lived." In English, it's: 'Memoirs.' What?  Such a nice title, lost. At least we still have  Heschel's, 'I Asked for Wonder.'

Out harvesting the flowers, I saw this little guy. It reminded me a little of the cover of the spanish-language Neruda memoirs. And I got to thinking, like I always do about that book: In Spanish, the title is, 'Confieso que he vivido' -- "I confess that I have lived." In English, it's: 'Memoirs.' What?  Such a nice title, lost. At least we still have Heschel's, 'I Asked for Wonder.'

2018 Week 32, Summer CSA Pick-up 10 of 26

Just at dusk, I sat down in the greenhouse to write you this note, but immediately popped up and scurried to the hilltop. Was that a wood thrush that I heard? Then I heard it again, just above the roar of the cicadas ... maybe. Back in 1871, John Burroughs said of the more ethereal, flutey, hermit thrush: “Ever since I entered the woods ... a strain has reached my ears from out of the depths of the forest that to me is the finest sound in nature –the song of the hermit thrush.”

But I'd have to quibble, because similar as their two songs are, the wood thrush is just the right kind of lonely. In their song, you can feel the whole continent of forest that they migrate, like a long inhalation, cool, and slow, and calming -- that much land -- and only a little sad. (The hermit thrush, like Thoreau said of some November days, 'oblige[s] a man to eat his own heart.' But that's just me.) What an unexpected sunset gift, that little bird, after a near-or-actually delirious, 95 degree day on the farm.

Thank you all for doing the basil tasting last week. The results were surprisingly consistent:

  1. Aroma 2 (F1) (left, bottom) - good raw, nice tang, laid back, sour.
  2. Eleonora (left, middle) - Meh.
  3. Everleaf (F1) (left, top) - strong, too strong, good for cooking but not raw, spicy, very basily.
  4. Genovese (right, bottom) - sweet & mild, tame, perfect.
  5. Italian Large Leaf (right, middle) - Minty x 3, really nice.
  6. Nufar (right, top) - powerful, hot, great, favorite x 2

I will watch them in the field, but will likely stick with Nufar and Genovese next year, and possibly Italian Large Leaf. Again, Thanks! On that note, I am switching from an older planting of basil to a newer one. If you want to make pesto, we have oodles of basil for you to work with. Just let me know, and I can show.

I harvested some of the Husk Cherries into separate containers, so we can do a taste-test on those as well. I am not especially partial to them, but I want to be! I've planted seven kinds, and four make their appearance at this pick-up. Here's hoping I really like one of them. :) Let me know what you think.

Also, do note that we got 7 (seven!) inches of rain last week. My! Everything likes to swell in that much rain, and sometimes to bursting. ... As you may have noted with the cherry tomatoes and husk cherries. The soil is still pretty saturated, but I think there will be less spontaneous post-harvest splitting in this batch.

Busy busy,
See you on the farm,
Austin

Expected Harvest

Greens
Chard
Kale

Veggies
Beans, Soy / Edamame
Carrots
Okra
Onions
Pepper, Sweet
Potatoes
Tomatoes

Fruit
Blackberry
Husk Cherry

Herbs
Anise Hyssop*
Ashwagandha, dried
Basil, Italian
Basil, Holy, Temperate
Basil, Thai
Cilantro
Dill
Hot Pepper, Fresh & Dried
Shiso
Sorrel

Staples
Beans, Dry
Popcorn

The Pickle Pile
Basil in the field ...

Flowers

*New This Week

 All the cool kids hang out in the Anise Hyssop.

All the cool kids hang out in the Anise Hyssop.

 Wait, who wrote that? :)

Wait, who wrote that? :)