Time

 Husk Cherries get their bath. There are 4 varieties in this bucket -- Aunty Molly's, Cossack Pineapple, Goldie, & Giant Cape Gooseberry -- with 2 more, related species, on the way -- Cape Gooseberry & Poha -- and 1 failure, Ambrosia. At some point, I will have them in separate containers for a taste test. Do note: 1) one does not eat the papery husk :), and  2) one eats the yellow-orange ripe berries, not the green. Though we shall see if the green ever ripen onwards.

Husk Cherries get their bath. There are 4 varieties in this bucket -- Aunty Molly's, Cossack Pineapple, Goldie, & Giant Cape Gooseberry -- with 2 more, related species, on the way -- Cape Gooseberry & Poha -- and 1 failure, Ambrosia. At some point, I will have them in separate containers for a taste test. Do note: 1) one does not eat the papery husk :), and  2) one eats the yellow-orange ripe berries, not the green. Though we shall see if the green ever ripen onwards.

2018 Week 31, Summer CSA Pick-up 9 of 26

I seeded the last head lettuce for transplant this evening, with the plan and hope that they mature just before our first frost. The 'North Pole' and 'Rouge d'Hiver' varieties, among others, with their wintry names, had me dreaming of the colder, changed rhythm of the late fall farm. In New Hampshire, the 4th of July was the last good chance to get one's carrots in for winter. And though the compression of summer is not the same here, it is not as expansive as the prospects of sweet potatoes and hot peppers first led me to believe. We have just a few more weeks to get the roots -- beets, radishes, turnips -- seeded for winter, and then the window closes. Summer does not last forever, not even down here, where, for a particular day or two, one thinks that it might.

The lettuce had me thinking of time, because there is hardly a thing a farmer can do to a farm in the present. We seed the summer tomatoes in February, the winter carrots in July. We scour the failure of the squash in May, and then spend the rest of the summer a year ahead of ourselves, modeling adjustments we can't make until the next spring. And because we are almost always some-time else, the hot peppers surprise us, and the onions, when they almost magically appear out of the forgetfulness of that duration.

And so the present surprises us; or, it surprises me. It is July! We have hot peppers! And it is not the fall yet, or winter, or even 2019, where I have been all these months.

So, yes, the hot peppers have started to come on. 'Bulgarian Carrot', 'Sarit Gat', 'Hot Paper Lantern', and 'Czech Black' are all showing ripeness, in addition to the 'Maule's / Lady Finger' and 'Ring of Fire' from last week. How exciting!

One of your fellow members was really psyched about some of the basil last week, and was curious about the variety. Because I have six varieties in the field this year, and harvest half every other week, we couldn't quite figure which witch was which. So ... let's have a taste test! In addition to the normal basil bin, I will have six buckets out with each variety, labeled by number, so as not to sway yee judges. Let me know what you think, if you're so inclined.

Note that the last snap bean planting went on walkabout, and so we will have diminished beans until the next generations come online. (I plant a new batch every 2 weeks, and each batch historically produces for 2-3 weeks, though I only depend upon them for 2 . This one conked out after less than 1. Hrmph.)

I hope you all are well,
See you on the farm,
Austin

 

Expected Harvest

Greens
Chard
Kale

Veggies
Beans, Soy / Edamame
Carrots
Okra
Onions*
Pepper, Sweet
Potatoes
Tomatoes

Fruit
Blackberry
Husk Cherry

Herbs
Ashwagandha, dried
Basil, Italian
Basil, Holy, Temperate
Basil, Thai
Cilantro
Dill
Garlic, Scapes
Hot Pepper, Fresh & Dried
Sage*
Shiso*
Sorrel

Staples
Beans, Dry
Popcorn

The Pickle Pile

Flowers

*New This Week

 I haven't had the chance to research this insect, as I just saw it this morning, but I'm curious ...

I haven't had the chance to research this insect, as I just saw it this morning, but I'm curious ...

 Wet weather makes fine weeding. The strawberries get cleaned-up for next spring.

Wet weather makes fine weeding. The strawberries get cleaned-up for next spring.