Rooting

 On the way to somewhere else, a smooshed flower by the compost pile. By the end of summer, perhaps we will have our surfeit of color, but the winter eye still catches.

On the way to somewhere else, a smooshed flower by the compost pile. By the end of summer, perhaps we will have our surfeit of color, but the winter eye still catches.

2018 Week 24, Summer CSA Pickup 2 of 26

It was a great, busy week on the farm, doing all at once what the rain denied us. Most exciting was turning a nearly empty field full, with a third planting of tomatoes, cucumbers, and summer squash; a second planting of watermelons; and our first, and last, planting of winter squash.That makes nearly 20% of the vegetable farm, which, on a Sunday meandering, feels quite nice to look at in its sudden completion. We also greenhouse-seeded the fall broccoli-family crops -- broccoli, cabbage, kale, and kohlrabi -- several weeks earlier than last year, and with the plan to do it again in a few more weeks, all with the aim of abundant broccoli, who has so far eluded this young farm. Many thanks to my dad, who came to assist a momentarily-bum-arm.

The summer farm continues to slide towards production. I harvested the first bin of snap beans this Saturday, there are a few singular summer squash ready to go, and the early tomatoes are likely less than a month from ripening. Our medicinal, nervine milky oats are almost all 'milky' as well, which to me is the true first sign of the awakening farm. This is a once-a-year- thing -- when the inner body of the oat seed metamorphoses from paper to grain, with a milky body in the interim -- so do take some for infusion while they're fresh. I will dry the remainder for winter.

Thank you so much for being here this summer,
See you on the farm,
Austin

PS: The plastic bags in the farmstand are a take-as-you-need-leave-as-you-can affair, so feel free to ...

Expected Harvest

Greens
Chard
Lettuce

Veggies
Beans, Snap*
Radish, Salad

Storage
Beans, Dry
   - Carolina Crowder
   - Kenearly Yellow Eye
   - Midnight Black Turtle
   - Quincy Pinto
Popcorn
Sweet Potato

Herbs
Ashwagandha, dried
Basil, Italian
Basil, Holy, Tropical*
Basil, Thai

Cilantro or Dill*
Garlic, Scapes
Hot Pepper, Dried
Lemon Balm
*
Milky Oats*
Scallions*

Flowers

The Pickle Pile
Beet
Onion
Parsnip

Radish, Winter
Rutabaga
Turnip, Winter

*New This Week

 A slew of "Earlies' out to trial this year -- quick, mostly Eastern European, small, red tomatoes. The second planting has the more colorful and eccentric heirlooms. This year we have 4 plantings -- 5 next year -- of 250 plants, each generation going out every 4-weeks. While that amounts to 1000 plants for 50 people -- or 20 tomato plants a person -- it's really more like 5 plants per person at their peak.

A slew of "Earlies' out to trial this year -- quick, mostly Eastern European, small, red tomatoes. The second planting has the more colorful and eccentric heirlooms. This year we have 4 plantings -- 5 next year -- of 250 plants, each generation going out every 4-weeks. While that amounts to 1000 plants for 50 people -- or 20 tomato plants a person -- it's really more like 5 plants per person at their peak.

 I take a lot of photos for records -- intentionally, and unintentionally ... such as when I wonder, "just what did the tomatoes look like last year at this time?" Here are 3 of 6 Italian Basils on trial this year.: Aroma II, Eleonora, and Everleaf (L-R).

I take a lot of photos for records -- intentionally, and unintentionally ... such as when I wonder, "just what did the tomatoes look like last year at this time?" Here are 3 of 6 Italian Basils on trial this year.: Aroma II, Eleonora, and Everleaf (L-R).

 And, Genovese, Italian Large Leaf, and Nufar (L-R). Similarly on trial are 6 Holy Basils -- 3 of which are the fruity-temperate 'Kapoor' style -- from High Mowing, Fedco, and Southern Exposure -- while 3 are the more traditional Asian tropical style -- Amrita, Rama, and one from Johnny's.  Should you ever notice and wonder about variation in the basil -- "Hrm, this one looks different from that one." -- now you know why.

And, Genovese, Italian Large Leaf, and Nufar (L-R). Similarly on trial are 6 Holy Basils -- 3 of which are the fruity-temperate 'Kapoor' style -- from High Mowing, Fedco, and Southern Exposure -- while 3 are the more traditional Asian tropical style -- Amrita, Rama, and one from Johnny's.

Should you ever notice and wonder about variation in the basil -- "Hrm, this one looks different from that one." -- now you know why.