Now and Later

 Millennium asparagus begins to pop up. It's the first year, so we can't harvest much -- a week or two this year, two or three next year, etc. -- but we have 1700 feet ringing the farm, so I think the few of us Winter CSAers should get quite enough.

Millennium asparagus begins to pop up. It's the first year, so we can't harvest much -- a week or two this year, two or three next year, etc. -- but we have 1700 feet ringing the farm, so I think the few of us Winter CSAers should get quite enough.

2018 Week 15, Winter CSA Pickup 10 of 13

Happy snow-day, all,

Although we have had a chilly spring -- and this will show in a later Summer CSA cropping -- I'll foolishly go on the record with a, "Well, it looks we're about out of the woods, and into warmer weather," luck-testing challenge to the farm gods. Because it just feels like it's time for things to grow. :)

The milky oats, radishes, turnips, snap peas, and spring spinach all germinated, though I am waiting a bit to see their rate. The carrots and beets are hanging out, but should germinate shortly with this good soil moisture and some warmer spring weather. The transplanted lettuce and onions look great, though the brassica -- kohlrabi, cabbage, kale, broccoli -- suffered some major, and historically anomalous, transplant shock. I did an immediate re-seeding, and have spent much time contemplating and researching the reason for their demise: my current best guess is wind, which we have had a lot of lately -- gusts up to 40mph, and steady 15-20mph blows. The beets, lettuce, and onions did not seem to mind, so it may be a particular interaction in this plant family. I'm on it. :)

On the perennial front, the moved rhubarb looks great, the asparagus is starting to pop, and each raspberry variety, in its own time, is leafing out. How exciting. The strawberries look better every time I look, which makes me think a simple row cover over the winter spinach -- sans hoops -- will be all we need next winter -- warmth, protection from dessication, and no great snowfall to keep us from uncovering it for harvest.

Also note that we are entering the mythological 'Hunger Gap,' that time of year when the storage crops wane and the fruits of summer are still just seeds. I have learned a lot here this first winter, and feel like next winter will be pretty awesome -- with respect to mass quantities of greens and prettier carrots -- but am glad we have strawberries, rhubarb, asparagus, and the dry beans to help us through this spring.

I have tentatively penciled-in a Sunday, May 13th, 2pm, Farm Tour and CSA run-through for all new and returning members, and perhaps the public as well. Let me know if I've chosen a bad day.

See you on the farm,
Austin

 

Veggies
Dry Beans
   - Carolina Crowder
   - Kenearly Yellow Eye
   - Kebarika
   - Midnight Black Turtle
   - Quincy Pinto
Popcorn - Cherokee Long
Winter Squash
  - Long Island Cheese
  - Seminole

Roots
Beets
Carrots
Celeriac
Kohlrabi
Onion
Parsnip
Potato
Sunroot
Sweet Potato
Radish, Winter
Rutabaga
Turnip, Winter

Medicinal Roots
Ashwagandha
Burdock / Gobo

Culinary Herbs
Cilantro
Chives
Hot Pepper

Tea Herbs
Anise Hyssop
Basil, Italian
Catmint
Chocolate Mint
Lemon Balm
Lemongrass
Peppermint
Shiso
Spearmint
Sunset Hyssop
Thai Sweet Basil / Horapa
Tulsi / Holy Basil

 A funny scene. Past research and my own experiments show a somewhat steady lb/acre yield within a pretty large window of potato spacing. With red clover in the middle, and the pathways tilled to install white clover, there isn't space for a traditional potato hilling. Instead of 1' spacing in a furrow, for this early potato planting we have 2' spacing and post-holes.

A funny scene. Past research and my own experiments show a somewhat steady lb/acre yield within a pretty large window of potato spacing. With red clover in the middle, and the pathways tilled to install white clover, there isn't space for a traditional potato hilling. Instead of 1' spacing in a furrow, for this early potato planting we have 2' spacing and post-holes.

 'Natascha' (yellow) seed potatoes cut for planting. In at the same time went 'Yukon Gem' (white), 'Chieftain' (red), and 'Bora Valley' (purple). These are the early types for summer, while in a few weeks I plant the later-maturing varieties for fall and winter.

'Natascha' (yellow) seed potatoes cut for planting. In at the same time went 'Yukon Gem' (white), 'Chieftain' (red), and 'Bora Valley' (purple). These are the early types for summer, while in a few weeks I plant the later-maturing varieties for fall and winter.

 I've been trying to bring back 'righteous' as a word. Because, righteous. Corn seeds root out. Espresso, Bodacious, and Incredible are new this year, while Kandy Korn and a bit of Ruby Queen -- the red one -- return, and Silver Queen retires. Corn won't germinate in cold weather, but it will grow ... which means if we start corn in the greenhouse, then transplant out in the spring a few weeks later, we can have early corn. Last year we had it the first day of summer. Let's see what we get this year.

I've been trying to bring back 'righteous' as a word. Because, righteous. Corn seeds root out. Espresso, Bodacious, and Incredible are new this year, while Kandy Korn and a bit of Ruby Queen -- the red one -- return, and Silver Queen retires. Corn won't germinate in cold weather, but it will grow ... which means if we start corn in the greenhouse, then transplant out in the spring a few weeks later, we can have early corn. Last year we had it the first day of summer. Let's see what we get this year.

 The onions go out. Last year worked so well, I kept it much the same, with the exception of less seeds per cell to increase bulb size, swapping Walla Walla in and Candy out, adding Newburg as a yellow storage trial, and decreasing the shallots until I find a variety which gives a solid yield.

The onions go out. Last year worked so well, I kept it much the same, with the exception of less seeds per cell to increase bulb size, swapping Walla Walla in and Candy out, adding Newburg as a yellow storage trial, and decreasing the shallots until I find a variety which gives a solid yield.