Miracles

The Onions pop from their soil blocks.

The Onions pop from their soil blocks.

2018 Week 7, Winter CSA Pickup 6 of 13

The upside to nothing in farming ever being a foregone conclusion -- that the seeds come up, or the rains come down, or the tomatoes mature, or the farmers' market fills with veggie-lovers -- the upside, is that everything's a miracle. And so it is with our first beets and onions. We put them in the soil-blocks, we water them, we heat them, we protect them from critters -- and, of course, we cross our fingers, and our toes, and our eyes. We do this, spring after spring, and when they come up ... every time, we marvel. As though this weren't a 10,000 year-old profession, and weren't also ours to boot. But, yes, the onions and beets are up, and the farm, as all do, continues to move from fist pump to jig to fist pump, and back again.

We have had 4.5 inches of rain so far this month, with more coming in the forecast. It may or may not delay an early March planting of spinach and carrots -- which, themselves, may or may not be delayed by the weather that follows. More importantly, though, the pathway to the greenhouse is currently soggy. I will be rolling out some tarps, but do know that I have a gravel path (and cottage garden) entry all ready and planned. I hope to have the money for the gravel by June, or earlier if CSA sales go well. Please hold tight until then, and thank you!

See you on the farm,
Austin

Veggies
Dry Beans
   - Carolina Crowder
   - Kenearly Yellow Eye
   - Kebarika
   - Midnight Black Turtle
   - Quincy Pinto
Leeks
Popcorn - Cherokee Long
Winter Squash
  - Long Island Cheese
  - Seminole

Roots
Beets
Carrots
Celeriac
Kohlrabi
Onion
Parsnip
Potato
Sunroot
Sweet Potato
Radish, Winter
Rutabaga
Turnip, Winter

Medicinal Roots
Ashwagandha
Burdock / Gobo

Culinary Herbs
Cilantro
Garlic
Hot Pepper

Tea Herbs
Anise Hyssop
Basil, Italian
Catmint
Chocolate Mint
Lemon Balm
Lemongrass
Peppermint
Shiso
Spearmint
Sunset Hyssop
Thai Sweet Basil / Horapa
Tulsi / Holy Basil

A new critter cage / seedling house for the spring. We lost onions, tomatoes, flowers, squash, watermelons, and many flowers last year to critters ... which was no fun. So, here's to fun! It does equally well in spring and summer -- twin-wall polycarbonate on the sides for insulation and light, and any top insulation for spring, with a breathable top for summer. Hip hip.

A new critter cage / seedling house for the spring. We lost onions, tomatoes, flowers, squash, watermelons, and many flowers last year to critters ... which was no fun. So, here's to fun! It does equally well in spring and summer -- twin-wall polycarbonate on the sides for insulation and light, and any top insulation for spring, with a breathable top for summer. Hip hip.

This is how we start. Remember when it was sunny, all that last week ago? I don't. :)

This is how we start. Remember when it was sunny, all that last week ago? I don't. :)

Rainfall

Les fleurs d'hiver ...

Les fleurs d'hiver ...

2018 Week 5, Winter CSA Pickup 5 of 13

Happy Groundhog day, all. Even if Bill Murray hadn't commemorated this mid-way through the journey, from the solstice to the equinox, with so fine a look at 'seeing' -- it is a movie about waking-up, isn't it? -- we'd be doing it here on the farm. Groundhog day marks the start of our farm year; we liven-up the greenhouse with seed flats of onions, beets, and hardy-annual flowers, and then follow it with kale, cabbage, broccoli, and kohlrabi a few weeks later.

A tray of onion seedlings, just popping from the soil, or still struggling to break free, might not be much to the un-farmed heart, but that green has iridescence, and we can taste it. It tastes like the entire expansiveness of our human life, we farmers might mutter. We would mutter, because who else could glance at a seed and know a truth like that? But we would accept the unbelieving, because everyone must have their own secret that stays secret, even though it has been said.

Aside from getting our soil-mix and cover crop seeds, planning the future farm, and weeding the asparagus for a new experimental seeding of subterranean / sub-clover as a kind of living/not-living mulch, I have spent most of my time updating the new crop and variety labels. As part of that work, I collected the histories and photos of the approximately one hundred tomato varieties planned for the coming year, and will have those in a book for you all this summer. When I bite into a lunchtime tomato-basil sandwich, I know the story behind the seed. Now you can, too.

See you on the farm,
Austin

 

Veggies
Dry Beans
   - Carolina Crowder
   - Kenearly Yellow Eye
   - Kebarika
   - Midnight Black Turtle
   - Quincy Pinto
Leeks
Popcorn - Cherokee Long
Winter Squash
  - Long Island Cheese
  - Seminole

Roots
Beets
Carrots
Celeriac
Kohlrabi
Onion
Parsnip
Potato
Sunroot
Sweet Potato
Radish, Winter
Rutabaga
Turnip, Winter

Medicinal Roots
Ashwagandha
Burdock / Gobo

Culinary Herbs
Cilantro
Garlic
Hot Pepper

Tea Herbs
Anise Hyssop
Basil, Italian
Catmint
Chocolate Mint
Lemon Balm
Lemongrass
Peppermint
Shiso
Spearmint
Sunset Hyssop
Thai Sweet Basil / Horapa
Tulsi / Holy Basil

Grey, rainy days are some of my favorite.

Grey, rainy days are some of my favorite.

Hibernacula

Round three of the seeds comes in. Our seed bins are overflowing, and it feels good: there's so much promise! / The difficulty of farming must, I now observe, self-select the short-of-memory or the native optimist. Because I'm so excited for next year, and it's going to be great! :)

Round three of the seeds comes in. Our seed bins are overflowing, and it feels good: there's so much promise! / The difficulty of farming must, I now observe, self-select the short-of-memory or the native optimist. Because I'm so excited for next year, and it's going to be great! :)

2018 Week 3, Winter CSA Pickup 4 of 13

Good morning all,

There has been some proper winter weather on the farm -- -4F low the other week, 2F this morning at waking, 10F as I type. Chilly, but not quite the -28F that settled onto my old New Hampshire farm; though reminiscent of my first winter there, when 'the polar vortex' was in the news, and all the farmers' winter greens turned to mush. On this farm, despite the collards turning floppy, and some covered lettuces getting frost burnt, this cold is a really good thing. We now know which crops and varieties to jettison in this system, which to keep, and which to look to for next year. That said, it won't be until Tuesday afternoon that I can see how the lettuce did in this new round of near-zero weather. Also, let's hope the cold is enough to decrease the pest populations.

Elsewhere on the farm, I have been in the office finishing-up my taxes for the year, updating the website, working on plans for our entryway (think wild flowers and an actual path), pondering marketing options, iterating the cover crop plan, and staking out the next three months of work. Fun!

On the marketing front, I've add a "Free Share Raffle." I suppose a $20 raffle ticket isn't free, but the share that follows is. Everyone who joins the CSA (and those who already did for this coming summer) are automatically enrolled. Once we have enough $20s to make a share, I pull a name from the hat and someone gets their share for free. If you know of anyone who might be interested, pass on the word: our homepage is atelier.farm, our CSA info. page is atelier.farm/csa, and our raffle is atelier.farm/sign-up/raffle. Ask questions if you have them.

On the recipe front, if you haven't tried the burdock yet -- a supposed heavy-metal and liver detoxifier -- I made a nice broth the other day that you might like. Take a burdock root, a carrot, and a radish, slice them into rounds, and drop into a non-metallic pot with 2-4 cups of water. I heated the mix in a slow-cooker on low for the day -- about 6 hours, but 4 would probably do. It all just tastes like a nice warm broth.

Also, beet kvass. It's super simple: 1) cut beets into a jar, 2) add water, 3) sprinkle in a little salt, 4) screw on the lid. I used a wide-mouth ball jar and have a breathing lid for fermenting pickles, but a loose seal would probably work absent that. Wait a few days, give it a go.

See you on the farm,
Austin

PS: Unless otherwise requested, the Summer CSA will be Wednesdays, 3-6pm. Let me know your preferred days and times with this super easy calendar thing. :)
 

Expected Harvest

Greens
Lettuce, perhaps

Veggies
Dry Beans
   - Carolina Crowder
   - Kenearly Yellow Eye
   - Kebarika
   - Midnight Black Turtle
   - Quincy Pinto
Leeks
Popcorn - Cherokee Long
Winter Squash
  - Long Island Cheese
  - Nantucket Long Pie
  - Butternut
  - Seminole

Roots
Beets
Carrots
Celeriac
Kohlrabi
Onion
Parsnip
Potato
Sunroot
Sweet Potato
Radish, Winter
Rutabaga
Turnip, Winter

Medicinal Roots
Ashwagandha
Burdock / Gobo

Culinary Herbs
Cilantro
Garlic
Hot Pepper

Tea Herbs
Anise Hyssop
Basil, Italian
Catmint
Chocolate Mint
Lemon Balm
Lemongrass
Peppermint
Shiso
Spearmint
Sunset Hyssop
Thai Sweet Basil / Horapa
Tulsi / Holy Basil

Fuzzy photo for a fizzy drink. This is the beet kvass just as the lid goes on -- red and gold beets, you might note. After a few days the beetiness saturates the liquid.

Fuzzy photo for a fizzy drink. This is the beet kvass just as the lid goes on -- red and gold beets, you might note. After a few days the beetiness saturates the liquid.

Full circles

Atelier is 5 acres in a broader 60. Sunset walks around the larger acreage are very nice for farm-plan dreaming.

Atelier is 5 acres in a broader 60. Sunset walks around the larger acreage are very nice for farm-plan dreaming.

2018 Week 1, Winter CSA Pickup 3 of 13

Happy New Year, everybody,

I hope you are warm, full, and thriving ... and encouraged by a new year. And if not, then all our fingers crossed and arms out and ears open in offering.

We passed the solstice into winter with some very workable weather, and so we managed to mulch all of the orchard trees, which means that the farm looks great right now: all of the blackberries, saskatoon, rose hips, and tree rings are weeded, covered, and ready for spring. Once the coldest weather passes, come late February, I will prune the 20 different kinds of fruit trees, shrubs, and berries we currently have. That is also when the raspberries get their mowing/pruning and weeding. They looked really good last year -- their first months after planting -- and so I am hopeful for them this summer. The same goes for the strawberries, in fact, which are cozy under their cover as you read.

In four more weeks, I scoot the sweet potato bins around and make room on the greenhouse heat mats for fresh seedings of onions, scallions, shallots, broccoli, kale, cabbage, and some hardy annual flowers. Just a few weeks after that, while we're still in winter, the summer tomato seeds come out. Which is to say, to every bin of vegetables at pick-up, there are many months of growing back-story. And, while I suppose the vegetables to you are a full and satisfying meal, for me those months from winter seed to summer dinner come out more like a full and satisfying life. Thank you all for letting me have that.

The Winter CSA continues, $100 for the month of January. If you could come with your check/cash, that would be great. (Or, sign-up online via credit card + its associated fee.) We will again have two Wednesday pick-ups, this January 3rd and the 17th, 3-6pm. Let me know if you will be early or late, and I will adjust. The last Wednesday -- the 31st -- will count as 'February.'

We have some very cold weather forecast for tonight -- with probably 5F on the farm. We will see how the uncovered collards and tatsoi make it through. I am confident with 10F, but am curious about 5F.

Summer CSA 2018: Unless otherwise requested, the CSA will be Wednesdays, 3-6pm. Let me know your preferred days and times with this super easy calendar thing. :)

See you on the farm,
Austin

PS: My sister Courtney drew a really lovely 2018 Lunar Calendar for her Root & Star children's magazine. It's useful for me on the farm, and maybe for you, too.

lunarcalendar2018_540x.jpg

Expected Harvest

Greens
Collards
Lettuce
Spicy Mix
Tatsoi?

Veggies
Dry Beans
   - Carolina Crowder
   - Kenearly Yellow Eye
   - Kebarika
   - Midnight Black Turtle
   - Quincy Pinto
Leeks
Popcorn - Cherokee Long
Winter Squash
  - Long Island Cheese
  - Nantucket Long Pie
  - Butternut
  - Seminole

Roots
Beets
Carrots
Celeriac
Kohlrabi
Onion
Parsnip
Potato
Sunroot
Sweet Potato
Radish, Winter
Rutabaga
Turnip, Winter

Medicinal Roots
Ashwagandha
Burdock / Gobo

Culinary Herbs
Cilantro
Parsley
Garlic
Hot Pepper

Tea Herbs
Anise Hyssop
Basil, Italian
Catmint
Chocolate Mint
Lemon Balm
Lemongrass
Peppermint
Shiso
Spearmint
Sunset Hyssop
Thai Sweet Basil / Horapa
Tulsi / Holy Basil

Fruit trees weeded and mulched, raspberries waiting.

Fruit trees weeded and mulched, raspberries waiting.

Good night

Some of the 15+ watermelons to trial for next year. I've momentarily dropped the more finicky melons to give space to focus on the watermelons. Is this what I get for having no frozen strawberries or raspberries in winter this year? -- a sweet-tooth appeased with watermelon seeds?

Some of the 15+ watermelons to trial for next year. I've momentarily dropped the more finicky melons to give space to focus on the watermelons. Is this what I get for having no frozen strawberries or raspberries in winter this year? -- a sweet-tooth appeased with watermelon seeds?

2017 Week 51, Winter CSA Pickup 2 of 13

Good morning all,

I hope you are enjoying these great long nights, as I am. Popcorn and a movie? Warm tea and a slow morning? These short days have been great for doing what is hard to do long -- rolling out 10,000 pounds of lime and gypsum for the fields by hand, so far, 4 hours at a time -- bookended by farm planning/dreaming. Curious after a marathon seed ordering session, I checked the numbers for farm plan 2017: 140 crops and 492 varieties across flowers (63 crops / 73 varieties), fruit (18/69), herbs (11/20), and vegetables (48/330). Tomatoes, at ninety-five varieties, constitute a large portion of the veggies. The future is less varieties -- why grow nine kinds of cucumbers? -- but for now we are seeing what works on this farm. If I sell enough shares, more perennial fruit and nuts could hop on top of that list. To that end, with the help of our farm's paternal benefactor, in the form of a loan, I ordered all of next year's seeds! It feels very good to have them here or in the mail, and to move on to the next big item on the list.

I can't wait to see you all this week. Please do let me know how the greens:veggies ratio worked-out. And I noted in the numbers that no one took any of the non-butternut winter squash. The remainder, in my opinion, are by far the better tasting varieties. I made some yummy seminole squash - sweet potato biscuits and pasta sauce. Do try!

See you on the farm,
Austin

PS: You get 10% cash back from every share that you successfully refer into the Summer CSA. :)

PS2: JD passed on her Burdock / Gobo  recipe for all you to have.

Kinpira Gobo (Braised Carrot & Burdock Root)

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Yield: Serves 3-4 as side dish

Ingredients:

  •     1 burdock root
  •     1/3 carrot
  •     1 Tbsp. sesame oil
  •     1 Tbsp. roasted white sesame seeds
  •     Ichimitogarashi (optional)
  •     Ito Togarashi (Red chili pepper threads) (garnish)

Seasonings

  •     3/4 cup dashi stock
  •     2 Tbsp. sake
  •     1 Tbsp. sugar
  •     1 Tbsp. mirin
  •     1 ½ Tbsp. soy sauce

Instructions:

    Peel gobo’s skin with peeler or traditionally we scrape (peel) the skin off with the back of kitchen knife. Then diagonally slice thinly so that each piece is about 2 inch length. Then collect some of the slices and cut into thin matchbox strips. Soak the gobo in water or vinegar water (just one drop of vinegar would do). Change water a couple of times until the water becomes clean. Then leave the gobo in water until you are ready to stir fry.

    Cut carrots into matchbox strips.

    In a frying pan, heat oil over medium high and stir fry gobo first. Then add carrot next after you cook gobo for a few minutes.

    Add Seasonings and cook until most of liquid evaporates.

    When the liquid is almost gone, add sesame oil and sprinkle sesame seeds and ichimitogarashi. 

Expected Harvest

Greens
Kale
Lettuce
Spicy Mix
Spinach?
Tatsoi

Veggies
Dry Beans
   - Carolina Crowder
   - Kenearly Yellow Eye
   - Kebarika
   - Midnight Black Turtle
   - Quincy Pinto
Leeks
Popcorn - Cherokee Long
Winter Squash
  - Long Island Cheese
  - Nantucket Long Pie
  - Butternut
  - Seminole

Roots
Beets
Carrots
Celeriac
Kohlrabi
Onion
Parsnip
Potato
Sunroot
Sweet Potato
Radish, Winter
Rutabaga
Turnip, Winter

Medicinal Roots
Ashwagandha
Burdock / Gobo

Culinary Herbs
Chives
Cilantro
Parsley
Garlic
Hot Pepper
Lemongrass

Tea Herbs
Anise Hyssop
Basil, Italian
Catmint
Chocolate Mint
Lemon Balm
Lemongrass
Peppermint
Shiso
Spearmint
Sunset Hyssop
Thai Sweet Basil / Horapa
Tulsi / Holy Basil

Some nice solstice oak.

Some nice solstice oak.

Garlic tucked-in for the winter, straw spread on with workshare James.

Garlic tucked-in for the winter, straw spread on with workshare James.

Strawberries tucked-in for the winter, with help from workshare James and his commandant, JD.

Strawberries tucked-in for the winter, with help from workshare James and his commandant, JD.

We happy few

Some farm friend in the lower field. The fence has kept out the deer, but rabbits, fox, groundhogs, and possum have so far left their trace.

Some farm friend in the lower field. The fence has kept out the deer, but rabbits, fox, groundhogs, and possum have so far left their trace.

2017 Week 49, Winter CSA Pickup 1 of 13

Hello Winter CSA'ers. We are a small but merry bunch. Welcome to Winter! Hip hip!

Pick-ups are every other Wednesday on the farm, 3-6pm -- though we can adjust hours if slightly earlier or later suit any of you, and we can talk make-up days. Although the Winter goes as long as you like, depending upon availability -- it's the first year here -- and your preferences, here is the schedule should it actually go the distance:

  1. 12/06/17
  2. 12/20/17
  3. 01/03/18
  4. 01/17/18
  5. 01/31/18
  6. 02/14/18
  7. 02/28/18
  8. 03/14/18
  9. 03/28/18
  10. 04/11/18
  11. 04/25/18
  12. 05/09/18
  13. 05/23/18

Vegetable field work is hours away from being done for the year, which means a nice transition into soil nutrition -- lime and gyspum to spread -- and orchard care -- fruit trees to weed, mulch, and prune; blackberries to trellis; raspberries to mow and weed; and perennial herb and flower beds to clean and peruse for a possible spring reseeding. Also, as many seeds to order as the pennies permit.

Last week during pick-up, I walked the farm with an eye to the future, and spent the last few days running all the necessary numbers. The current finalization is an orchard expansion upward into the annuals -- blueberries, kiwiberries, muscadine grape hybrids, justaberries, seaberries -- with pomegranates and hazelnuts interlacing what is already there. PLUS, movement of the annual herbs and flower, and strawberries, to the top by the greenhouse, and the whole mid-rotation into grains: wheat, corn, staple beans, and possibly barley. The orchard fruit trees especially take money, so if you know of anyone who may be interested in joining next Summer, their dollars would make it happen a year or two sooner rather than later. And you get hundreds of dollars back for signing them up! :) Win-Win-Win.

Happy Winter everyone,
Ask questions if you have them,
See you on the farm,
Austin

Expected Harvest

Greens
Kale
Lettuce
Spicy Mix
Tatsoi
Tokyo Bekana

Veggies
Dry Beans
   - Carolina Crowder
   - Kenearly Yellow Eye
   - Kebarika
   - Midnight Black Turtle
   - Quincy Pinto
Leeks
Popcorn - Cherokee Long
Winter Squash
  - Long Island Cheese
  - Nantucket Long Pie
  - Butternut
  - Seminole

Roots
Beets
Carrots
Celeriac
Kohlrabi
Onion
Parsnip
Potato
Sunroot
Sweet Potato
Radish, Winter
Rutabaga
Turnip, Winter

Medicinal Roots
Ashwagandha
Burdock / Gobo

Culinary Herbs
Chives
Cilantro
Parsley
Garlic
Ginger
Hot Pepper
Lemongrass
Turmeric

Tea Herbs
Anise Hyssop
Basil, Italian
Catmint
Chocolate Mint
Lemon Balm
Lemongrass
Peppermint
Shiso
Spearmint
Sunset Hyssop
Thai Sweet Basil / Horapa
Tulsi / Holy Basil

An ugly shot, but these are two quick hoops up for the winter. Some 15-inch ground posts plus 10-foot EMT bent to size, means a crawl-able tunnel for winter greens. When the farm is fully up and running, we'll have 5 hoops for the winter -- in the grain rotation and following a spring/summer fertility cover crop. Some of the advantages to these small movable hoops are: reduced cost, soil health in rotation, natural rain water and leaching as opposed to salt-buildup from well water, rotation-based fertility, disease reduction in rotation, and relatively easy future expansion.

An ugly shot, but these are two quick hoops up for the winter. Some 15-inch ground posts plus 10-foot EMT bent to size, means a crawl-able tunnel for winter greens. When the farm is fully up and running, we'll have 5 hoops for the winter -- in the grain rotation and following a spring/summer fertility cover crop. Some of the advantages to these small movable hoops are: reduced cost, soil health in rotation, natural rain water and leaching as opposed to salt-buildup from well water, rotation-based fertility, disease reduction in rotation, and relatively easy future expansion.

Warm Tea

My sister snapped a photo as she stopped by to find me packaging the dried herbs for winter tea.

My sister snapped a photo as she stopped by to find me packaging the dried herbs for winter tea.

2017 Week 48, Summer CSA Week 26 of 26

This is the last week of the Summer CSA, so let's do first things first: Thank you! Thank you all so much for being a part of the farm in its very first season. A first year in any spot, but especially one un-farmed, is a bit like pin-the-tail-on-the donkey, with much blindness and guessing. And so I very, very much appreciate your patience and kindness all summer for what to me has been uncharacteristically hit-and-miss production. To you I extend a long bow in gratitude.

Beyond that kind of thankfulness, though, is a simpler one. I am very happy and thankful for having met you all, and for having had the chance to grow for you. Thank you!

I harvested the winter carrots, radishes, turnips, beets, and rutabaga last week, and will gather the parsnips and burdock today. The sun rises and sets with the farm now, and I got to watch it as I topped the last carrots at dusk, then wished for a headlamp as I walked the row to gather them. I had this feeling as the sun sank down and the gloaming came on, and I sat on a bucket with carrots in my lap, that I was being remade. So let us add fall twilight to that list with the rain, of rebirths and remakings we did not know we needed, but are given all the same. I do not think it is a coincidence, that of the twilight and the rain, both are a kind of letting go.

See you on the farm,
Austin

Expected Harvest

Greens
Tatsoi
Kale
... and more?

Veggies
Leek
Popcorn
Winter Squash
  - Long Island Cheese*
  - Nantucket Long Pie
  - Butternut
  - Seminole

Roots
Beets
Carrots
Kohlrabi
Onion
Potato
Sunroot
Sweet Potato
Turnip, Winter

Herbs
Cilantro
Garlic
Ginger
Lemongrass
Pepper, Hot
Turmeric

I bottled 100+ jars of dried herbs for winter tea, which is more than we need, and less than we had, but a good time all the same.

I bottled 100+ jars of dried herbs for winter tea, which is more than we need, and less than we had, but a good time all the same.

A Thanksgiving

Tatsoi flattens-out in the cold.

Tatsoi flattens-out in the cold.

2017 Week 47, Summer CSA Week 25 of 26

The garlic is in! I broadforked 8 beds, amended with lime and gypsum, and planted three varieties for next yar -- Shvelsi (a beautiful purple-stripe), Music, and Silverwhite. I will cover with straw once this crazy wind calms down, which has been a happily steady 10-15 mph gust all morning.

I also ordered the tomato seeds this morning. We had about 45 varieties this year, but will up it to 100 next year in an expedited search for what grows well on this farm. Part of the increase is a new early maturing generation to start the season, and an abundance of red slicing types, as none that I tried this year were especially successful. I'll have the labels in the field for watching their health, but anyone interested in a field-walk tomato taste-off next summer should let me know. Aside from the one exception -- Sungold, the super sweet orange cherry -- all are heirlooms or otherwise open pollinated types. I will also do a better job presenting the history of each variety, as I expressed that not-well-at-all this year.

Note that the ginger and turmeric will only last in the fridge so long, but both freeze well. Please take some while it's still fresh!

For the last month I had a "snackluck and field walk" comment on the board, but somehow forgot to talk with you all about it. If you are interested in a farm tour some coming Sunday at 2pm, let me know at pick-up!

Happy Thanksgiving!
See you on the farm,
Austin

Expected Harvest

Greens
Tatsoi*
Kale
... and more?

Veggies
Broccoli
Leek
Popcorn
Winter Squash*
  - Nantucket Long Pie
  - Butternut
  - Seminole

Roots
Beets
Carrots
Kohlrabi
Onion
Potato
Sunroot
Sweet Potato
Turnip, Winter

Herbs
Cilantro
Garlic
Ginger
Lemongrass
Pepper, Hot
Turmeric

Starting to broadfork the garlic beds, which is a hopeful antidote to the drowning this spring.

Starting to broadfork the garlic beds, which is a hopeful antidote to the drowning this spring.

Shiso dried down. Although it's the first year, there is still a fair quantity of herbs for winter. So, hip hip.

Shiso dried down. Although it's the first year, there is still a fair quantity of herbs for winter. So, hip hip.

Washing the turmeric and ginger.

Washing the turmeric and ginger.

Field walks

Popcorn stalks laid down.

Popcorn stalks laid down.

Expected Harvest

Greens
Arugula
Bok Choy
Lettuce
Kale
Spicy Mix

Veggies
Broccoli
Leek
Popcorn
Winter Squash

Roots
Beets
Carrots
Fennel, Bulb
Kohlrabi
Onion
Potato
Sunroot
Sweet Potatoes
Turnip, Winter

Herbs
Cilantro
Garlic
Ginger
Lemongrass
Pepper, Hot
Turmeric

2017 Week 46, Summer CSA Week 24 of 26

Good morning all,

October and November had been so far a bit of a dream, warm and even green, with the grass still growing. But we woke Saturday morning right back where we ought to be, to Jack Frost and his artwork in every corn of the farm. I spent the day prior pulling the last muddy ginger, turmeric, lemongrass, and ashwagandha roots -- all tropical plants -- for ourselves, before winter took them for her own. It occurs to me, and I should let you know, that most of those, particularly the turmeric and ashwagandha, go well decocted into a warm milk.

With the schedule just slightly less frenetic, it has been so, so nice to walk the farm with an observant and dreaming eye, rather than a task-based one. Standing in the orchard, I can feel the trees accumulate their years -- the farm's logo -- which is something of a metaphysical, even emotional, stance against the grass of the vegetable patch above it, which shows not even a trace of all this summer's effort, and all these years never has. See even just the title of Arlo's, "A Farm Dies Once a Year."

And I can see the mulberry trees I have yet to plant or even buy, twenty-five foot sentinels stationed along and outside the fence, food for the birds and wildlife, so that they might-just-maybe have their fill before coming to our own berries. Also, the fence-line they walk draws the distinction between effort -- our farm -- and maybe what we could just call 'breathing,' but you might also call 'wild' -- which is the tall grass in the wind outside of it. It can't just be the farmer who feels so much to walk through unmade land, but certainly that heart feels the difference. And to me it feels like breathing.

So, a deep breath,
a long bow of thanks to you all this first season,
See you on the farm,
Austin

Leeks, left to decompose after prepping in the field.

Leeks, left to decompose after prepping in the field.

Rutabaga likes the frost, getting sweeter as the winter proceeds.

Rutabaga likes the frost, getting sweeter as the winter proceeds.

Rounding the Horn

Autumn sunset crawls up the farm.

Autumn sunset crawls up the farm.

2017 Week 45, Summer CSA Week 23 of 26

Four inches of rain came last week, and we have a drizzly week ahead, so it is too wet to broadfork the garlic beds. That said, the second it isn't, we will have them ready, and the garlic in. New next year will be Shvelsi (aka Chesnok Red), a really beautiful purple-striped hardneck, as well as the Music and Silverwhite we grew this year. I popped the garlic on Saturday -- separated the cloves from the bulb -- in preparation, all-the-while trying to soak this past year in. You may recall that this is the first crop I planted last year for this year's CSA. So, in a way, we are rounding the horn again.

I have 5+ folks from outside the Summer CSA who are interested in signing-up for the Winter CSA, but space is limited. If you are interested in staying-on for winter, you can sign-up online, or just come with a check, and I can sign you up. Let me know soon, either way, so I can let these other folks know, too.

Do note that this Winter will be more provisional than Summer, running 4 weeks at a time ($25/wk  or $100 / 4-week chunk), until we run out of storage crops, or perhaps the winter greens fail. As the summer yields were lower than expected, and my system for growing winter greens is untested here in VA -- and different from what I did in NH and MI -- I would rather not guarantee a whole winter in advance. I hope you understand, but do ask questions if you don't.

On the line-up:

Greens: arugula, spicy mix, lettuce, kale (until it's too cold), and spinach -- with an eye on the health of the spinach.

Roots: beets, carrots, kohlrabi, onions, potatoes, sunroot, sweet potatoes, radishes, rutabagas, turnips -- and some bonus celeriac, which may have hollow heart.

Other:  winter squash, dried beans, popcorn.

Herbs: Fresh cilantro, parsley, scallions; dried: tea herbs from summer, hot pepper, garlic.

As I noted before, the Summer CSA is now for sale! I have corrected the plan so that next year is way better -- more of everything in quantity, duration, size, and health, plus the fall planting of kale, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, kohlrabi, etc. will go in a month earlier, plus the raspberries will be in.

Get 10% back for every dollar you successfully refer into the CSA. Think $100 back for a typical household of 2 adults. Signing-up sooner rather than later helps the farm, as we are still in start-up mode. Also, there are only 25 'shares' available this year, due to the new format. As before, you can pay on the way in summer, after a deposit to get us started and the seeds and plants ordered.

See you on the farm,
Austin

Expected Harvest

Greens
Arugula
Lettuce
Kale
Spicy Mix
Tokyo Bekana

Veggies
Broccoli*
Leek
Popcorn*
Winter Squash

Roots
Beets
Carrots
Fennel, Bulb
Kohlrabi
Onion
Potato
Sunroot
Sweet Potatoes
Turnip, Winter

Herbs
Cilantro
Garlic
Ginger
Lemongrass
Pepper, Hot
Turmeric

Asparagus yellowing-out for the fall. For a few years, we can pick a week in spring for each year it has been in the field. In short, we get a week of harvest next year. Hip hip.

Asparagus yellowing-out for the fall. For a few years, we can pick a week in spring for each year it has been in the field. In short, we get a week of harvest next year. Hip hip.

Fall Cleanup

Turmeric after the frost, coincidentally on 10/26-27, the calculated average first frost for the farm. Reminds me of the frost-burnt tips of the corn from all those moons ago in Spring.

Turmeric after the frost, coincidentally on 10/26-27, the calculated average first frost for the farm. Reminds me of the frost-burnt tips of the corn from all those moons ago in Spring.

2017 Week 44, Summer CSA Week 22 of 26

It is fall clean-up time on the farm, and the work feels great. All of the old beans that I left after harvest to mature as a cover crop, are now mowed into pieces for the fungal life to pull on in. The same is true for everything now past, like the popcorn, the summer squash, or old flowering lettuce. I also mowed the orchard, to give a good look for blackberry, saskatoon, and rose hip weeding, as well as a way in to mulch our small fruit trees. It was a dry summer, but most of the trees look good. I am also perusing the possibility of more fruit -- blueberries, kiwi berries, and grapes -- into the mix, though it will take some shrinking of the 'annuals' portion of the farm.

I will unexpectedly be out of the state this Wednesday for a funeral, but I will have the CSA set-up just before I go, so no worries on your end.

As I noted before, the Summer CSA is now for sale! I have been correcting the plan to make next year way better -- more of everything in quantity, duration, size, and health, plus the fall planting of kale, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, kohlrabi, etc. will go in a month earlier, plus the raspberries will be in. Get $100 off for every share you successfully refer into the CSA*. Signing-up sooner rather than later helps the farm, as we are still in start-up mode. Please ask questions if the new format befuddles, but otherwise think of it as a free-choice buffet.

See you on the farm, next week,
Austin

*I still think of a share as a household of two adults etc. ...

Expected Harvest

Greens
Arugula
Bok Choy
Lettuce
Kale
Spicy Mix

Veggies
Leek
Winter Squash

Roots
Beets
Carrots
Fennel, Bulb
Onion
Potato
Sunroot (Jerusalem Artichoke)
Sweet Potatoes
Turnip, Winter

Herbs
Cilantro
Garlic
Ginger
Lemongrass
Pepper, Hot
Turmeric

Frost

Some 'Khing Yai' Thai ginger. The fancy translation is, get ready: 'big ginger.' 'Bubba Baba Blue' Hawaiian ginger is the other in the field. Enjoy all over the place.

Some 'Khing Yai' Thai ginger. The fancy translation is, get ready: 'big ginger.' 'Bubba Baba Blue' Hawaiian ginger is the other in the field. Enjoy all over the place.

Expected Harvest

Greens
Arugula*
Tokyo Bekana*
Lettuce
Kale
Spicy Mix*

Veggies
Eggplant
Leek
Okra
Pepper, Sweet
Squash, Winter
Tomatoes

Roots
Beets
Carrots
Fennel, Bulb
Onion
Potato
Sunroot (Jerusalem Artichoke)
Sweet Potatoes
Turnip, Winter

Herbs
Cilantro
Garlic
Ginger*
Lemongrass
Pepper, Hot
Turmeric*

2017 Week 43, Summer CSA Week 21 of 26

All spring and summer we work to keep our plants alive, but some mornings in the fall we walk out in the fields and hear ourselves wonder, "Why won't you just die?" And we smile at that hearing. Well, we had our first semi-real frost, which killed the last of the basil, the beans, the summer squash, and most of the tomato greenery. The okra, surprisingly, still looks okay. In short, we are just about out of the summer farm, and into the fall one, with its roots and greens for the morning harvest.

The Winter CSA will most likely be a month-to-month affair, as I nail it down here in Virginia. The biggest loss so far are the potatoes, which I had already shifted into the Summer CSA. I am still watching the winter greens, as I know there is much weeding ahead before we are out of the one-inch woods.

The Summer CSA is now for sale. The farm depends upon your early sign-up to buy the seed and seed starting mix in winter that make our vegetables ready in summer. Onions, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, and the like all start their life in February so you can have them in July. Get $100 back for every share you successfully refer into the CSA. In theory, you could get paid to be a member, if you're that good at marketing.

Okay, see you on the farm,
Austin

So denotes the passage of frost. A Summer Squash leaf the morning after.

So denotes the passage of frost. A Summer Squash leaf the morning after.

Just because I thought it was pretty. A Popcorn tassel before the compost heap.

Just because I thought it was pretty. A Popcorn tassel before the compost heap.

Green

Arugula comes in.

Arugula comes in.

2017 Week 42, Summer CSA Week 20 of 26

A long morning fog, drizzle in the night, lushness in the field. It feels really nice to walk the farm right now, especially after such a droughty summer. The last planting of winter greens germinated perfectly with the rain, and the earlier batch that came in but spottily, is all there now. Timing -- heat and day length are the two main physiological variables -- is now the thing to watch. The upshot, though, is a green farm. On the greens front: kale, lettuce, and bok choy are new for the week. I will grab the arugula and spicy mesclun next week.

After a soil test this fall, I discovered the farm soil to be a bit more acid than the test last year. That's exciting news, as it's something measurable to correct among a raft of other more nebulous movements toward farm health. I ferried 13,000 lbs of lime (and gypsum) to the farm last week, then stacked the bags in the greenhouse with workshare James. I will be throwing it in a cart to spread in the months to come, thinking all the while of happier tomatoes and carrots. On that end, I have put together a preliminary review of each crop this year. It's super informative, but probably super boring for the non-farmer. Have a look if you're curious.

I have also been pondering how to phase the CSA onward and out of its start-up phase. I re-did all of the "CSA" information on the website, so if you are curious about the farm next year, do have a look. The principal alteration is a 'buffet' style CSA: so no points, no pounds, no gallons; just take what you need for the week. The price would be related to household size. It hasn't happened yet, so please let me know what you think if you're thinking about being a member again.

See you on the Farm,
Austin

Expected Harvest

Greens
Bok Choy*
Chard(s)
Lettuce*
Kale*

Veggies
Bean, Soy/Edamame (last week's)
Eggplant
Leek
Okra
Pepper, Sweet
Squash, Summer
Squash, Winter*
Tomatoes

Roots
Beets
Carrots
Fennel, Bulb
Onion
Potato
Sunroot (Jerusalem Artichoke)*
Sweet Potatoes
Turnip, Winter*

Herbs
Cilantro
Garlic
Lemongrass*
Pepper, Hot

Flowers
Flowers
Corn Stalks
Pumpkin Gourds

The Spicy Mix pops up.

The Spicy Mix pops up.

Sitting out at pick-up, they just seemed so pretty. Mostly 'Rossa di Milano' on the left, with a bit of 'Red Wethersfield.' 'Dorata di Parma' and 'Clear Dawn' on the right.

Sitting out at pick-up, they just seemed so pretty. Mostly 'Rossa di Milano' on the left, with a bit of 'Red Wethersfield.' 'Dorata di Parma' and 'Clear Dawn' on the right.

Abundance

'Long Island Cheese' and 'Rouge Vif D'Etampes' winter squash curing in the greenhouse. Not pictured are 'Candystick Dessert' Delicata, 'Burgess Buttercup', 'Spaghetti', 'Waltham' Butternut, 'Nantucket Long Pie', and 'Seminole'.

'Long Island Cheese' and 'Rouge Vif D'Etampes' winter squash curing in the greenhouse. Not pictured are 'Candystick Dessert' Delicata, 'Burgess Buttercup', 'Spaghetti', 'Waltham' Butternut, 'Nantucket Long Pie', and 'Seminole'.

2017 Week 41, Summer CSA Week 19 of 26

While this first year has hit a few crops hard -- 90% losses on onions, potatoes, garlic, carrots, etc. -- I harvested 30 bins of sweet potatoes last week, which is about a half ton. For a tiny farm, that's pretty sweet. It also made me recognize a feeling I had been missing: abundance. It's the best part about farming, and its absence is at the heart of the worst. But, yes, all the better spirits of the farm dwell in its abundance.

So, sweet potatoes are up -- curing at the moment, but they should be ready Wednesday -- while that odd 36 degree morning brought the basil down. This is the last week of my favorite -- and your least favorite :) -- crop on the farm: edamame! Get it while you can! This rain is washing the newly spread milky spore into the ground, which we with-crossed-fingers hope will progressively reduce the Japanese beetle population -- who so loved the rhubarb, raspberries, rose hips, and asparagus this year.

Speaking of the rain, it has been a month since we had more than a passing drop of rain, so even this less-than-an-inch event is very much appreciated. The winter spinach, especially, will like it for moisture, as well as temperature, in its germination. I seeded two and a quarter miles of winter greens (by the row), but still quizzically peer at its potential. This rain should clear up any confusion as to its germination.

Be so well,
See you on the farm,
Austin

Expected Harvest

Greens
Chard(s)
Tokyo Bekana

Veggies
Bean, Snap
Bean, Soy/Edamame
Eggplant
Leek, Fall
Okra
Pepper, Sweet
Squash, Summer
Tomatoes

Roots
Beets
Carrots
Onion
Potato
Sweet Potatoes*
Turnip, Salad

Herbs
Cilantro
Garlic
Pepper, Hot
Peppermint*
Spearmint*

Flowers
Flowers
Corn Stalks
Pumpkin gourds

Sweet Potatoes come out, so cleanly.

Sweet Potatoes come out, so cleanly.

Homecoming

Bulb Fennel (l) and the last planting of Summer Squash (r) in the roll-killed Soybean & Millet cover.

Bulb Fennel (l) and the last planting of Summer Squash (r) in the roll-killed Soybean & Millet cover.

2017 Week 40, Summer CSA Week 18 of 26

My best farming memories are in autumn, drinking morning tea with the new morning grogginess, harvesting the winter radishes just past the early-coming dark, or feeling an odd peace settling into the light, now red, in every corner of the farm. The rush now is different, too. These last big jobs are the last big jobs, and we do not have a word big enough for that feeling of contentment. Except, maybe, autumn.

We have one good, busy month ahead of us. I will start on the sweet potatoes today -- please give them a week to cure in the greenhouse -- plant one last big batch of spinach and lettuce for the winter, make room for the fall-planted garlic, transplant the winter herbs, and harvest all the last drying tea herbs before the frost. And then the orchard finally gets some love.

If you have any extra used bags to leave for your fellow members, I am sure they would be grateful.

Also, note that some wee pumpkin gourds and corn stalks will be in the share this week.

Be well & See you on the farm,
Austin

Expected Harvest

Greens
Chard(s)
Komatsuna*

Veggies
Bean, Snap
Bean, Soy/Edamame
Eggplant
Leek, Fall
Okra
Pepper, Sweet
Squash, Summer
Tomatoes

Roots
Beets
Carrots
Onion
Potato
Turnip, Salad

Herbs
Basil, Italian -- if healthy.
Cilantro
Garlic
Pepper, Hot
Tea herb not yet chosen*

Flowers
Corn Stalks*
Pumpkin gourds*

*New This Week

A not-so-great photo of Rotation E's Soybean & Millet roll-killed in-situ mulch, 6 weeks later. That's some wee 'North Pole' lettuce just transplanted in the right-most bed. It's working way better than I thought, so 'Yay!'

A not-so-great photo of Rotation E's Soybean & Millet roll-killed in-situ mulch, 6 weeks later. That's some wee 'North Pole' lettuce just transplanted in the right-most bed. It's working way better than I thought, so 'Yay!'

Equal Parts

The 'Cherokee Long' popcorn is all shucked and ready for a final dry-down.

The 'Cherokee Long' popcorn is all shucked and ready for a final dry-down.

2017 Week 39, Summer CSA Week 17 of 26

Equal part day and equal part darkness. It's always that way for just a moment, and then we are in to something new. Do we even have words for these two halves of the year, when the days prevail, or now the nights? I think, yes we do. But we each have our own words. We are now beyond the autumn equinox, so welcome to this new world, however you may call it.

The farm continues to be farmy: two varieties of beans left to thresh and winnow, some new milky spore -- an organic lower life-form that doesn't play well with the invasive Japanese beetles -- to spread in the orchard, winter greens to continue seeding as I look for the proper time to do it in Virginia, some Asian greens and lettuce to transplant, and all of the crop plans to plan -- my favorite. We have one more week of heat, and then it looks like a cool-down; so expect the warm-weather crops to trail off as cooler season veggies come in.

See you on the farm,
Austin

Expected Harvest

Greens
Chard(s)
Lettuce, Head

Veggies
Bean, Snap
Bean, Soy/Edamame
Broccoli Raab
Eggplant
Leek, Fall
Okra
Pepper, Sweet
Squash, Summer
Tomatoes

Roots
Carrots
Beets
Onion, Fresh
Potato, Fresh
Turnip, Salad

Herbs
Basil, Italian -- if healthy.
Cilantro -- last week's
Dill*
Garlic
Pepper, Hot
Shiso*

Flowers

*New This Week

Four Weeks

'Carolina Crowder' dry beans, threshed and mostly winnowed. The 'Midnight Black Turtle' are also done. Four more to go.

'Carolina Crowder' dry beans, threshed and mostly winnowed. The 'Midnight Black Turtle' are also done. Four more to go.

2017 Week 38, Summer CSA Week 16 of 26

The forecast this week is "80 degrees and sunny," but walking the fields in the evening, I can tell -- and I know -- that by Friday we will be four weeks away from the average first frost. It's kind of exciting, actually: watching the root crops race in their growth with these last days of the season, anticipating the sweetness that comes out in vegetables in the cold, and scheduling in a good, long cleaning of the perennial herb, flower, and fruit beds for the winter.

Some things we don't want out in the frost -- the winter squash, popcorn, sweet potatoes, and ginger, for instance -- so some of the winter squash and all of the popcorn come out to cure/dry today. The sweet potatoes, ginger, and turmeric we will leave until the last second, for as much growth as possible, then pull in to shelter just as it gets nippy. All of the tea herbs will also get a haircut in the next few weeks, to put away a final drying batch for winter. Like I said, "Exciting!"

See you on the farm,
Austin

Expected Harvest

Greens
Chard(s)
Lettuce, Head*

Veggies
Bean, Snap
Bean, Soy/Edamame*
Broccoli Raab*
Eggplant
Leek, Fall
Okra
Pepper, Sweet
Squash, Summer
Tomatoes

Roots
Carrots
Beets
Onion, Fresh
Potato, Fresh
Turnip, Salad

Herbs
Basil, Italian -- if healthy.
Sunset Hyssop*
Garlic
Pepper, Hot

Flowers

*New This Week

Clouds and corn stalks. It's good lignified biomass for the fields, but I will be cutting some of the cornstalks to add to the 'Flower' part of the CSA.

Clouds and corn stalks. It's good lignified biomass for the fields, but I will be cutting some of the cornstalks to add to the 'Flower' part of the CSA.

The first year for the Rosa rugosa, and many Japanese beetles at play, but we got rose hips. Their main purpose on the farm is for mid-winter Vitamin C, and to flavor tea.

The first year for the Rosa rugosa, and many Japanese beetles at play, but we got rose hips. Their main purpose on the farm is for mid-winter Vitamin C, and to flavor tea.

Forties

'Cherokee Long' popcorn for winter. I will watch the forecast, and either dry in the field or greenhouse.

'Cherokee Long' popcorn for winter. I will watch the forecast, and either dry in the field or greenhouse.

2017 Week 37, Summer CSA Week 15 of 26

The farm had a low of 42 degrees the other morning, which is to say we are likely into lettuce weather again. I have grown lettuce every week through the summer, but haven't enjoyed the flavor, and so left it in the field. It tastes all right now, though, so here's to cooler weather and the vegetables that it brings. Salad turnips are also up for harvest.

Next up on the docket is the somewhat slow, experimental process of threshing our six different dry beans, all of which behave a little differently due to their shape and moisture content. The winter greens -- a spicy mix, lettuce mix, and spinach -- will phase into the field, week by week, as I watch for the right time to do this next year. At this point, a day's difference in planting can mean a week's difference in harvest. It is high time to give some attention to the orchard, too, including a weeding at the base of the trees before adding a nice mulch of wood chips, courtesy of the tree work done along Preddy Creek rd. last month.

A CSA clarification: Please understand that joining a CSA is a bit like getting season tickets for a team. If you miss a game, there is no extra ticket for the next one coming. The same thing with a CSA, which also deals with 'perishable' items, particularly in summer. If you miss a week, you do not get double the next week. That said, so far this year we have had about a quarter more in the share per week than the dollar value paid, which means that there might be up to six free weeks in the Summer CSA by Thanksgiving. Thanks for understanding! And if you don't, please ask questions, or offer alternatives for me to explore.

See you on the farm,
Austin

Expected Harvest

Greens
Chard(s)
Lettuce, Head*

Veggies
Bean, Snap
Bean, Soy/Edamame*
Leek, Fall
Okra
Pepper, Sweet
Squash, Summer
Tomatoes

Roots
Carrots
Beets
Onion, Fresh
Potato, Fresh
Turnip, Salad*

Herbs
Basil, Italian -- if healthy.
Basil, Holy/Tulsi*
Chocolate Mint*
Garlic
Oregano*
Pepper, Hot

Flowers

*New This Week

A bit of ginger pokes up through the hilling. We will let these and the turmeric size up for as long as possible.

A bit of ginger pokes up through the hilling. We will let these and the turmeric size up for as long as possible.

Definition

Raspberries come in-full next year, but there have been enough so far to tease. As always, feel free to grab as many as you like.

Raspberries come in-full next year, but there have been enough so far to tease. As always, feel free to grab as many as you like.

2017 Week 36, Summer CSA Week 14 of 26

On the colors of the earth. In the midst of the over-burnt glare of summer, it's hard to remember the nearly neon, profusive greens are spring. But I think this new palette is my favorite: gentler, sometimes sadder, but more wholly defined; not just green, but all colors, and in the coolness more visible.

The farm brain is currently focused on winter and next spring: A trial generation of early spring flowers went in last week, as seedlings that I actually seeded in July. Parsley, scallions, and cilantro are up in the greenhouse as seedlings for fresh herbs this winter. The lettuce and spinach seed is in the walk-in, cooling itself to more readily germinate when we put them in a few weeks from now. And the old seed catalogs were out at pick-up last week, to see if there's anything we're not doing that might make next year better. Let me know from your end.

I am pleased to note that I seeded a half bed of spinach last week before pick-up, and they are germinated, and brilliant in their greenness. I seeded the other half this morning, because what was I thinking only doing half a bed in the first place, I smile.

I hope you are well,
See you on the farm,
Austin

Expected Harvest

Greens
Cabbage(s)
Chard(s)

Veggies
Bean, Snap
Leek, Fall
Okra
Pepper, Sweet
Squash, Summer
Tomatoes

Roots
Carrots
Kohlrabi
Beets
Onion, Fresh
Potato, Fresh

Herbs
Basil, Italian -- if healthy.
Basil, Thai Sweet
Garlic
Pepper, Hot
Peppermint

Flowers

*New This Week

'Lemon Drop' hot peppers just came in, the last to mature for the year. Amazingly, they ACTUALLY taste like lemon. Wow! If hot peppers are your thing, do give them a try.

'Lemon Drop' hot peppers just came in, the last to mature for the year. Amazingly, they ACTUALLY taste like lemon. Wow! If hot peppers are your thing, do give them a try.

Although I haven't been that impressed with the summer flowers this year -- I'm working on next year's plan as time allows -- this Cactus Flowered zinnia's pretty pretty.

Although I haven't been that impressed with the summer flowers this year -- I'm working on next year's plan as time allows -- this Cactus Flowered zinnia's pretty pretty.

Light

I have always been a sucker for the gravity of resting things.

I have always been a sucker for the gravity of resting things.

2017 Week 35, Summer CSA Week 13 of 26

The goldenrod is in bloom, the ragweed is out. And I don't know if you can see it, but even the light of day has changed now. There is maybe something buried deep in the human heart that feels the seasons slide, but especially summer into autumn, and especially in the farmer's heart. Sometimes it feels like worry -- such as it is this first year on the farm -- but in the end, it's always 'pencils down,' and a kind of joyful astonishment when you pull your head up from the page, and just catch the farm as it falls asleep under the harvest moon.

All of the broccoli family crops finally make their way into the field this week, our last large planting of the year. Another winter carrot replacement is crossing its fingers for germination -- with a very keen irrigator watching over it. The dry beans are half out of the field now, and should be all out by the end of the day. Seed garlic is on for fall delivery -- Silverwhite, Music, and Chesnok Red for 2018. The onions are dry enough to pack into the walk-in cooler for the winter, and I plan to trim them down to their recognizable balls during pick-up this week. The herb drying is going well, and is fun to boot. And the hot peppers that will dry, are doing so too. The habaneros, which do not dry as well, will be bonus for you to make hot sauce as you please.

See you on the farm,
Austin

Expected Harvest

Greens
Cabbage(s)
Chard(s)

Veggies
Bean, Snap
Bean, Soy/Edamame
Leek, Fall
Okra
Pepper, Sweet
Squash, Summer
Tomatoes, Large & Small

Roots
Carrots
Kohlrabi
Beets
Onion, Fresh
Potato, Fresh

Herbs
Basil, Italian
Basil, Holy/Grapao*
Dill, Just a bit!*
Garlic
Pepper, Hot
Catmint, Persian*

Flowers

*New This Week

Extra hot peppers in bonus this week, so grab some to make sauce! 'Peach Habanero' & 'Red Paper Lantern'

Extra hot peppers in bonus this week, so grab some to make sauce! 'Peach Habanero' & 'Red Paper Lantern'

My friend made dinner ... so many times better than I do. Thai food from home.

My friend made dinner ... so many times better than I do. Thai food from home.