Farm Bucks

In addition to our Farmshare CSA, we offer Farm Bucks, an alternative way to purchase vegetables at a discount while still supporting the farm. They’re worth more than the dollars you spend on them, and are a great option if your schedule or interests do not suit the breadth and depth of the CSA. Consider them to be Farmstand credit.

  • Farm Bucks are good at the Thursday Farmstand for all produce, flowers, honey, and live ferment sales.

  • A Farm Bucks purchase is fixed at $500. Pay before Jan 1st, and get $550 to spend at the Farmstand—10% more than you paid for. Pay on or after Jan 1st, and get $525 in Farm Bucks—5% more than you paid for. A 5% online transaction fee will be added to all credit card purchases.

  • Your purchase amounts to about $25 at the Farmstand each time you visit—over the course of 6 months, and missing as many weeks as the average Farmshare CSA member,

  • We will keep a record on our end, so there is nothing for you to lose. If your credit runs low, we’ll let you know. Just use the available Farm Bucks “checks” at the Farmstand.

  • Farm Bucks EXPIRE at the end of the year, but you may purchase another round for the next year with up to $110 of remaining Farm Bucks (priced at the current dollar value). Extensions will be made at the farm’s discretion to accommodate unexpectedly low production and subsequent farmstand selection, or for any other reasonable reason.

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The Farmstand

Thursdays, 3-7pm
May through October

3194 Preddy Creek Rd
Charlottesville, VA 22911

Left at the top of the Driveway,
Farmstand in the Greenhouse

Note: We rent our land from private owners, so please stick to the day and time to respect their privacy. Thank you so much!

 

Produce Availability

After the CSA goes through on Wednesday, the perishable remainder goes out to the Farmstand. This is the logic that organizes that excess:

  • Summer produce—squash, cucumbers, tomatoes, peppers, watermelons, etc.—is variously capable of preservation, but is most likely to be at the farmstand.

  • Greens are hard to preserve, and so all excess goes to the farmstand.

  • Flowers don't preserve, and go to the farmstand.

  • Roots—like carrots, beets, and potatoes—get a bulk harvest in the spring or summer, which makes it easier to determine whether or not they make it into the farmstand, and at what quantity. Because they keep so well, though, it is nice to have them around for the CSA to balance any production failures.

  • Herbs—cilantro, basil, mints, etc.—are easy to dry for winter, but are also present at the farmstand.

  • Berries—strawberries, blackberries, etc.—can freeze, but we only have so much freezer for CSA members, and so some of them may also make it to the farmstand. Plus, you like fruit, and so we want you to have it.

Farm Production, Farmshare Use, and Farmshare Availability    Every farm year is different.  Though some might be better for one crop or worse for another, often enough there are years which are generally better or worse for the farm, from a production perspective. On the chart, that’s the bright orange line that moves up and down from year to year.   The Farmshare CSA , while slightly variable in the amount of produce it takes from the farm each year at an individual level, also varies in total shares/stakes sold. In general, we try to keep sales less than 75% of expected production in order to maintain CSA freedom of choice. This amount of produce used is the just-slightly moving blue area on the chart.   The Farmstand  receives what remains of the farm production after the Farmshare’s draw. This also varies year to year, based upon the farm’s production and Farmshare demand. It is the green area on the chart.   In the original CSA model , 100% of farm production went to the CSA shareholders, meaning that they directly felt the variability of the year’s production in their subdivided box share. By selling less than 75% of the year’s expected production to the Farmshare, we are able to move the year’s volatility into the Farmstand, buffering shareholders / stakeholders.

Farm Production, Farmshare Use, and Farmshare Availability

Every farm year is different. Though some might be better for one crop or worse for another, often enough there are years which are generally better or worse for the farm, from a production perspective. On the chart, that’s the bright orange line that moves up and down from year to year.

The Farmshare CSA, while slightly variable in the amount of produce it takes from the farm each year at an individual level, also varies in total shares/stakes sold. In general, we try to keep sales less than 75% of expected production in order to maintain CSA freedom of choice. This amount of produce used is the just-slightly moving blue area on the chart.

The Farmstand receives what remains of the farm production after the Farmshare’s draw. This also varies year to year, based upon the farm’s production and Farmshare demand. It is the green area on the chart.

In the original CSA model, 100% of farm production went to the CSA shareholders, meaning that they directly felt the variability of the year’s production in their subdivided box share. By selling less than 75% of the year’s expected production to the Farmshare, we are able to move the year’s volatility into the Farmstand, buffering shareholders / stakeholders.